dijs 2010

Greg

Jim

Greg

“Green Machine”Kyuss

Greg's in a stoner rock mood this week, so he adds a song by Kyuss to the Desert Island Jukebox. The band has announced plans to reunite next year, sans Josh Homme. Greg describes their sound as a particular kind of heavy music that has great melody and could accompany you on a long drive through the desert….or the desert island. So pop "Green Machine" in your stoner van and get going.

Go to episode 265

Jim

“I Put a Spell on You”Screamin' Jay Hawkins

The life and death of John Lennon has been on a lot of our minds these days, Jim included. He recently watched the film Nowhere Boy, which depicts Lennon in his teen years. One of the scenes shows Lennon first discovering a vinyl record by Screamin' Jay Hawkins. As Jim explains, Hawkins was one of the first people to bring“fear and loathing”to rock ‘n’ roll. His 1956 track "I Put a Spell on You" is a classic. It was banned from a number of radio stations at the time, but if it was good enough for John Lennon, it's certainly good enough to add to the Desert Island Jukebox.

Go to episode 260

Greg

“Talk to Me”Southside Johnny and the Asbury Jukes,Southside Johnny and the Asbury Jukes

Bruce Springsteen has a new box set out, and while this is of no interest to our own Jersey native (and Bruce-hater) Jim DeRogatis, Greg dove right in. It has numerous cuts from the Darkness on the Edge of Town era that didn‘t make the album, and as Greg explains, one of the recipients of Springsteen’s prolific writing was the group Southside Johnny and the Asbury Jukes. Like Springsteen, they defined the horns-filled, R&B-influenced Jersey Shore sound-not to be confused with the Shore of today. It's a sound Greg wants with him in the Desert Island Jukebox, so he adds "Talk to Me" by Southside Johnny and the Asbury Jukes.

Go to episode 259

Jim

“Ah Pook the Destroyer/Brion Gysin's All Purpose Bedtime Story”John Cale

Jim needs a palette cleanser after that last review, so he plays an example of a case where someone from the literary world went over to the rock world, and it worked. William S. Burroughs collaborated with a number of musicians toward the end of his life. And on Dead City Radio, the beat writer read his work while accompanied by music from the likes of Sonic Youth, Donald Fagan, Chris Stein, and best of all according to Jim, John Cale. On "Ah Pook the Destroyer/Brion Gysin's All Purpose Bedtime Story," Burroughs read while Cale played, and the two were a perfect match. Jim takes that track with him this week to the desert island. For more, check out the Sound Opinions interview with John Cale.

Go to episode 255

Greg

“Compared to What”Les McCann

The last album inspired Greg to go back to the original version of "Compared to What." Vocalist and jazz pianist Les McCann paired up with saxophonist Eddie Harris at 1969's Montreux Jazz Festival to record their version of the Eugene McDaniel song. It was first made famous by Roberta Flack, but for Greg, McCann's take on the anti-Vietnam protest song is the most moving. He adds it to the Desert Island Jukebox.

Go to episode 251

Jim

“Vapour Trail”Ride

One release Jim is excited about this fall is a reissue of the debut album by Ride called Nowhere. So he chooses a track from it, "Vapour Trail" to add to the Desert Island Jukebox. Along with My Bloody Valentine, Ride established the groundbreaking shoegaze sound, proving that it is possible to do something new with guitar, bass and drums. And Jim puts Nowhere up there with Nevermind, even if it never received the same kind of acclaim.

Go to episode 249

Greg

“Some Velvet Morning”Nancy Sinatra

Naturally Hawk got Greg jonesing for some Sinatra/Hazelwood. In the '60s arranger and songwriter Lee Hazelwood took Nancy Sinatra under his wing and turned her into a feminist icon. While father Frank wasn't crazy about the relationship, and Greg admits the sound was at times creepy, he really digs tracks like "Some Velvet Morning," and takes it with him this week to the desert island.

Go to episode 248

Greg

“Can You Get to That”Funkadelic,Funkadelic

It's Greg's turn to drop a quarter into the Desert Island Jukebox this week. He has been loving "Rill Rill" by Sleigh Bells recently, and wanted to go back to the source. That song samples "Can You Get to That" by Funkadelic. Their 1971 album Maggot Brain is a classic, combining folk, rock and funk. And, the song's vocalist Gary“Diaperman”Shider died a few weeks ago at age 56.

Go to episode 244

Jim

“Vaseline”Elastica

Jim was in a Britpop mood when he chose this week's Desert Island Jukebox song. When you think Blur you think Damon Albarn, and when you think Damon Albarn, you might go back to his former lady love Justine Frischmann of Elastica. Incidentally, M.I.A. also ran in circles with Frischmann, and they collaborated on some of her early songs. Elastica broke up by 2001, but before that they released a slew of great pop-rock hits, including "Vaseline."

Go to episode 243

Greg

“Dallas”The Flatlanders

After talking with Chrissie Dickinson, Greg thought about his own country music epiphany. He got his own guide to the genre from legendary singer Jimmie Dale Gilmore, who formed The Flatlanders with Joe Ely and Butch Hancock. As Greg explains, no one in Nashville was buying the credibility of three Texas“Flatlanders,”but their unique take on roots country went on to be hugely influential, especially to future alt-country acts. Greg chooses "Dallas" from the band's one and only release More a Legend Than a Band to add to the Desert Island Jukebox.

Go to episode 241

Jim

“The Ballad of Easy Rider”The Byrds

It's Jim's turn to add a song he can't live without to the Desert Island Jukebox this week. He honors iconic actor Dennis Hopper, who died last week at age 74. Hopper not only directed classic movies like Easy Rider, he chose their soundtracks. So for his track, Jim chooses "The Ballad of Easy Rider." The version in the film features a solo performance by Roger McGuinn of The Byrds, but Jim prefers the version by the whole band.

Go to episode 236

Greg

“Mala Vida”Mano Negra

With France in the air this episode, Greg thinks back to one of his favorite French rock acts: Mano Negra. Co-founded by musician Manu Chao, the band deftly combined rock, reggae, afropop, punk and ska. Their track "Mala Vida," from their 1989 release Puta's Fever truly gives new meaning to the term“world music,”and it's a song Greg wants to groove to on the desert island.

Go to episode 235

Jim

“Rock the Boat”Aaliyah

During The xx interview, the band spoke of their admiration for Aaliyah. This got Jim thinking about the R&B singer, who died in 2001. As he says, she wasn‘t the greatest singer, she wasn’t the most original, but she had real charisma and star power. He adds the track Rock the Boat, from Aaliyah's third and final self-titled album.

Go to episode 233

Greg

“Hole in the Bucket”Spearhead

After listening to K'Naan discuss the challenge of fitting into the record industry's boxes, Greg is reminded of another hard-to-define act-Michael Franti and Spearhead. They combined hip hop, funk and reggae in their 1994 debut Home. To Greg, Franti is one of the great political singers of all time, and he chooses to add the song "Hole in the Bucket," from Home to the Desert Island Jukebox.

Go to episode 231

Jim

“It's Oh So Quiet”Björk

Jim has spent the last week looking at images of the volcanic eruption in Iceland and thinking about a way to honor the European nation. Arguably its biggest musical export is Björk. Jim hasn't loved her sparse, robotic sound in recent years, but will always remember songs like "It's Oh So Quiet" fondly. So, he adds his favorite Björk track to the Desert Island Jukebox.

Go to episode 230

Greg

“Double Dutch”Malcolm McLaren

Greg honors Malcolm McLaren in the Desert Island Jukebox segment. McLaren, a central figure in the British punk scene, died last week at 64. He's best known as the manager of the Sex Pistols, but as Greg explains, he was equally influential in bringing hip hop to the masses. McLaren was exposed to hip hop in the early '80s, and was blown away by the beats, art and music surrounding the genre-one that, like punk, centered around urban life and anti-establishment. So, in memory of McLaren, Greg adds a hip hop-inspired song from his first solo album Duck Rock called "Double Dutch."

Go to episode 229

Jim

“Bad Reputation”Joan Jett

For his Desert Island Jukebox selection, Jim chooses "Bad Reputation," a song by girl group-pioneer Joan Jett. A film about Jett's band The Runaways was just released, but as Jim explains, that band's identity wasn't as much about empowerment as it was about their youth and sexuality. Since that time the singer has spent a career trying to distance herself from that, and Jim calls her the godmother of riot girl rock. That attitude comes through in "Bad Reputation," which we always enjoyed as the Freaks and Geeks theme song.

Go to episode 227

Greg

“You Can't Put Your Arms Around a Memory”Johnny Thunder

Greg gets to drop a quarter in the Desert Island Jukebox this week, and chooses a Joey Ramone-inspired song. The Ramones singer was a hero to Greg early on, and his punk spirit helped kick-start Greg's writing career. Joey was always a fan of the classic pop songs he grew up on, and when he got the chance late in life, he worked with one of his own heroes, Ronnie Spector. The album was one of Joey's last projects, so to remember him, Greg plays her version of the Johnny Thunder song "You Can't Put Your Arms Around a Memory" as produced by Joey Ramone.

Go to episode 224

Jim

“These Days”Nico

For Jim's Desert Island Jukebox selection this week, he looked to one of his favorite rock-infused films, The Royal Tenenbaums. He describes his favorite scene between Gwyneth Paltrow and Luke Wilson that ends with the Nico track "These Days." With her perfect“oval”voice, Nico put a spell on everyone from Jackson Browne to Andy Warhol, and Jim is not immune.

Go to episode 222

Greg

“Supernaut”1000 Homo DJ's

One of the many rock deaths this month was that of Dannie Flesher, co-founder of Wax Trax! Records. The Chicago based store and later label defined the industrial sound made most famous by Ministry. And it's where Greg cut his teeth as a music fan. So, for his Desert Island Jukebox selection this week, Greg chooses a cover version of Black Sabbath's "Supernaut" recorded at Wax Trax! Records. The song is performed by 1000 Homo DJ's and fellow Wax Trax fan, Trent Reznor, and can be found on the label's 1994 box set.

Go to episode 218

Jim

“Replenished”Vic Chesnutt

At the end of the show Jim drops a quarter into the Desert Island Jukebox. He uses his turn at the DIJ to talk about Vic Chesnutt, a musician who died this past Christmas. Chesnutt, who was a paraplegic since the age of 18, was discovered and championed by R.E.M.'s Michael Stipe. As Jim explains, music was like a lifeline for Chesnutt, and one of his favorite albums by the singer/songwriter was 1998's The Salesman and Bernadette. To honor the Athens, GA musician, Jim chooses to add "Replenished," a track from that record, to the Desert Island Jukebox.

Go to episode 216