dijs 2009

Greg

Jim

Greg

“Everybody's Trying To Be My Baby”George Harrison

Talking with Dhani Harrison reminded Greg of George Harrison's often un-sung guitar skills. And one of George Harrison's biggest influences was Carl Perkins. In fact all The Beatles adored Perkins and his rockabilly picking, Mersey beat sound they made famous. So for his Desert Island Jukebox selection this week, Greg wanted to choose a song that referenced the Beatles‘ love of Carl Perkins and Harrison’s terrific guitar work. "Everybody's Trying To Be My Baby" is his tribute to two quiet, talented guys.

Go to episode 210

Jim

“Leather Idol”Tuscadero

While reviewing Weezer, Jim was reminded of another alternative era band, Tuscadero. Like Weezer, they debuted in 1994 with a similarly named record called The Pink Album. And like Weezer they wrote songs about adolescence, nostalgia and pop culture. But unlike Weezer, their move to a major label didn't bring them great success and longevity. Jim considers Tuscadero one of the many lost heros and heroines from alternative '90s, and he wants to add their track "Leather Idol" to the Desert Island Jukebox.

Go to episode 207

Greg

“Radar”Morphine

Greg wanted to honor the memory of Morphine frontman Mark Sandman with this week's Desert Island Jukebox selection. Sandman died a decade ago, and now Rhino has released a two-disc collection of rarities and live tracks. But Greg thinks the band's“creepy,”low-rock sound is best enjoyed through their studio albums. He loved Sandman's sense of atmosphere and brilliant lyrics. They can be heard in his pick, "Radar," from Morphine's 1995 album Yes.

Go to episode 206

Jim

“Frenzy”The Fugs

This past weekend, Jim was talking with someone about his book about The Velvet Underground. That person said, "How can you talk about the Velvet Underground without mentioning The Fugs!?" Well, he's right. The Fugs were hugely influential on the VU, and also paved the way for the "freak folk" acts of today. None were half as freaky as The Fugs, who came from the beat scene of the 1950's. These writers and musicians made crude, but wonderful protopunk rock, and Jim chooses their track "Frenzy" to take with him to the desert island this week.

Go to episode 204

Greg

“Long Way Around the Sea”Low

Greg needs to clear his Christmas palette, so he chooses a worthy holiday song to put in the Desert Island Jukebox. This is one he could listen to all year long. In 1999 the Minnesota trio Low released their Christmas EP. Members of Low are practicing Mormons, and you can hear the influence of their faith on their music. In "Long Way Around the Sea," Low strips the song of any mentions of bows and sleighs and gets to the essence of the holiday. To Greg, it's deliberate, beautiful, and something he'd like to listen to if stranded on an island.

Go to episode 203

Jim

“Out of Control”Lime Spiders

Usually Jim and Greg take inspiration from something in the show or something in the news for their Desert Island Jukebox picks. But this week, Jim is inspired by nothing more than a desire for an injection of high energy rock. He chooses a song by Australian garage rockers the Lime Spiders. Jim thinks their second single "Out of Control" is one of the best garage revival songs he's ever heard, and that's why he can't live without it.

Go to episode 200

Greg

“She's Not a Little Girl”Green

For his turn at the Desert Island Jukebox, Greg wants to add a song by one of his favorite“Power Pop”bands. The term was actually coined by Pete Townshend during The Who's pre-rock opera era. It now describes a slew of bands who use a lot of big melodies, tight arrangements, harmonies and prominent guitar riffs. The Midwest produces a lot of power pop bands, including Green. The band has had many incarnations, but it's the constant force of Jeff Lescher that gives the group its edge and puts them above the rest for Greg. He takes their song, "She's Not a Little Girl" with him to the desert island.

Go to episode 198

Greg

“Going Down South”North Mississippi Allstars

For his Desert Island Jukebox selection this week, Greg was thinking about the lasting influence of Jim Dickinson. He will, of course, be remembered through his music, but his legacy also lives on with his two sons Luther and Cody. Together with Chris Crew they are the North Mississippi Allstars. Their music is steeped with the blues sound of the Hill Country. Different from Delta blues, Hill Country blues is all about the drone and trance. Greg says it's perfect for all-night drinking and dancing–something he plans to do a lot of when stranded on a desert island. He adds the band's song "Going Down South" to the DIJ.

Go to episode 195

Jim

“Ghosts of American Astronauts”The Mekons

It's Jim's turn to add a song he can't live without to the Desert Island Jukebox. To honor the 40th anniversary of the moon landing, he chooses "Ghosts of American Astronauts" by The Mekons. Jim was initially daunted by the Chicago punk/alt-country band. They've been going for three decades, so where do you start? So Good It Hurts was the doorway for him, and he discovered how smart, political and also seductive they can be on songs like "Ghosts of American Astronauts."

Go to episode 191

Greg

“Emma”Hot Chocolate

Maxwell got Greg in the mood for some of that great soul music from the late '70s era. For him the British group Hot Chocolate stands out from the rest. They had a big hit with "You Sexy Thing," but that track doesn't do them justice. Hot Chocolate came out of the ska and reggae tradition that emphasized great storytelling. You can hear this on the song "Emma," Greg's Desert Island Jukebox addition for this week.

Go to episode 189

Jim

“I Believe”Buzzcocks

Jim and Greg's choices for the Desert Island Jukebox are often influenced by current events or discussion in an episode. But this week, Jim just wanted to hear some Buzzcocks. Their album Singles Going Steady is one of the great compilation albums of all time. But the one great single that didn‘t make it on is the band’s 1979 song "I Believe." Is it a manifesto? Or just a joke? Jim doesn‘t know, but he’ll be happy listening over and over again.

Go to episode 182

Greg

“"Where Did You Sleep Last Night?"”Nirvana,The Vaselines,Nirvana

To cap off the show, Greg adds a track to the Desert Island Jukebox. Last week he played Nirvana's live version of "Where Did You Sleep Last Night?" This week he wants to highlight another great song from that Unplugged set: "Jesus (Don't) Want Me For a Sunbeam." It was written by the Scottish duo The Vaselines. The band has headed out on a new US tour and re-released their acclaimed 1992 album The Way of the Vaselines. Both are excellent opportunities to take another look at one of Greg, and Kurt's, all-time favorite songs.

Go to episode 180

Jim

“Heaven Help Us All”Stevie Wonder

Jim's Desert Island Jukebox pick was inspired by a documentary he saw on the summer of '68. He saw the footage of the riots in Chicago during the Democratic Convention in a whole new light because of the reporting he's been doing on the city government's attitude toward live music. The city council is attempting to pass legislation that would severely hinder local promoters. And Jim couldn't help but compare the image of our current mayor to that of his father screaming, yelling and proclaiming himself“the law.”That image was juxtaposed with the Stevie Wonder song "Heaven Help Us All," and Jim thinks it's a perfect choice to bring with him to the desert island.

Go to episode 173

Greg

“Devil's Pie”D'Angelo

Recently Greg's been thinking about whatever happened to soul singer D'Angelo. He made what Greg would consider a masterful album in 2000. Voodoo put D'Angelo at the heart of the neo-soul movement, but that's the last we‘ve heard from him. Greg can’t explain the disappearance, but he can relive the singer's glory days with this week's Desert Island Jukebox song "Devil's Pie."

Go to episode 171

Jim

“St. Elmo's Fire”Brian Eno

As discussed earlier, U2, and countless other artists, turn to Brian Eno as a producer. For this week's Desert Island Jukebox pick, Jim wanted to illustrate why. Eno is a magician in the studio. He turns one sound into another and the result is pure joy. You can hear this in Eno's 1975 song "St. Elmo's Fire" from Another Green World.

Go to episode 170

Greg

“Green Manalishi”Fleetwood Mac

Fleetwood Mac has reunited for another tour, inspiring Greg's Desert Island Jukebox pick this week. While most people think of Lindsay Buckingham or Stevie Nicks, Greg's favorite incarnation of Fleetwood Mac was the earliest, with British blues guitarist Peter Green. An idol to peers like Eric Clapton, Green heavily influenced heavy metal musicians. But, he was also hit hard by LSD use. According to Greg, you can hear Green's descent into madness, as well as his guitar skills, in this week's DIJ song, Fleetwood Mac's "Green Manalishi."

Go to episode 169

Jim

“Wild Thing”Tone-Loc

Last week Greg marked the anniversary of Buddy Holly's death with his Desert Island Jukebox. This week Jim honors another important anniversary: the release of Tone-Loc's Loc-ed After Dark. Tone-Loc may not be who you immediately think of when you go through the names of important hip hop artists, but Jim insists that his gravelly voice over that Van Halen riff are the perfect combination. And, his take on "Wild Thing," is as great as The Troggs'.

Go to episode 167

Greg

“Well... All Right”Buddy Holly

This week Greg adds a track to the Desert Island Jukebox. He uses his turn at the DIJ to mark the anniversary of the death of Buddy Holly. Holly, along with The Big Bopper and Ritchie Valens died in 1959. It was a momentous date in rock history, and in his short life, Holly was hugely influential. Greg describes how the singer and guitarist laid a blueprint for what we know today as rock and roll. One of Holly's most influential recordings is "Well… All Right," the song Greg chooses to add to the Jukebox. It's an intimate, stripped down production, and as you listen Greg thinks you'll hear the roots of albums like Rubber Soul.

Go to episode 166