Fugazi’s Repeater, Opinions on Psychedelic Country Artist Sturgill Simpson

fugazi

Washington D.C. post-punk band Fugazi reshaped the definition of punk in America. Their 1990 debut album, Repeater, connected with a generation and eventually sold more than a million copies. Jim and Greg talk with founding member Ian MacKaye about the writing and recording of the album and its impact. Plus we review Sturgill Simpson's new album, Sound and Fury, and learn what song got a member of the band Dehd "Hooked on Sonics."

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Repeater

Repeater & 3 Songs Fugazi

Fugazi was a post-punk band from Washington D.C. that maintained a fiercely independent, DIY ethic and still went on to sell millions of records. Though their best known song is probably "Waiting Room" from their 1988 self-titled EP, their first full length album, Repeater, deserves to be considered a classic album according to Jim and Greg.

Initially an open-ended outlet for former Minor Threat frontman Ian MacKaye's musical creativity, Fugazi grew into something more when all four members found ways to contribute their ideas. MacKaye told Jim and Greg that Repeater was their first release after former Rites of Spring singer Guy Picciotto started playing guitar in the group in addition to singing. Greg pointed out that Picciotto and MacKaye approached their guitars more like sound machines than traditional instruments, letting the rhythm section of drummer Brendan Canty and bassist Joe Lally drive the songs.

The conversation covers the lyrical differences between Fugazi and Minor Threat, the importance of Fugazi's live shows and explains why a tank of helium was necessary for one of Fugazi's biggest shows in Chicago.

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Sound & Fury Sturgill Simpson

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Sturgill Simpson just released his latest album Sound & Fury, on which he continues to blend country with psychedelic influences and push the boundaries of music. Both Jim and Greg are enthusiastic about Simpson's fourth album, and can't get enough of the dramatic sonic elements like cranking the guitar way up and the Can-like instrumentals. The lyrics are also important, as Simpson shares his experience of clashing with the country music industry and more universal themes like the environment and today's political climate. Greg thinks that it would wrong if critics left this album off their "best of year" lists at the end of 2019.

Hooked On Sonics: Emily Kempf of Dehd

Dehd

Dehd singer and bassist Emily Kempf explains how Cat Power's 2003 song "I Don’t Blame You" helped her see a place for herself in the music world.

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