Results for Willis Earl Beal

interviews

Willis Earl Beal

Willis Earl Beal has had quite a career trajectory. Born in Chicago, he joined the army, only to quit shortly thereafter. He then moved to Albuquerque, NM, where, while homeless and working as a security guard, he started recording music in a very crude way—on a karaoke machine with a microphone. He left CDs of these recordings and flyers around town until they were discovered by Found Magazine. That led to a deal with XL Recordings and two releases, including the most recent, Nobody Knows.

Go to episode 411
reviews
Acousmatic SorceryAcousmatic Sorcery available on iTunes

Willis Earl Beal Acousmatic Sorcery

The story of Willis Earl Beal is unlike any other. The Chicago native only took to music to curb loneliness after moving to Albuquerque, N.M. He had no training, but a desire for emotional connection that eventually led to some press and an eventual signing to XL Recordings. Now he's got a new debut album out called Acousmatic Sorcery. Jim compares his sound to that of alternative hip hop artist Divine Styler. It's a kind of“Martian blues”with a lo-fi, folk edge. The production needs some work but Jim says Buy It. Greg admits Beal can‘t really play much, but his percussion, and especially his voice, are quite strong. This is the kind of stuff Alan Lomax would’ve dug. Greg doesn't know if Beal has another album in him, but he gives Acousmatic Sorcery a Buy It rating.

JimGreg
Go to episode 332
lists

The Best Albums of 2013

Go to episode 419
news

Music News

Another Pitchfork music festival has come and gone in Chicago's Union Park. The festival - put on by the taste-making webzine of the same name - often serves as a useful barometer for where underground pop is headed in the next year. This time around, the message was a little muddled. While relative newcomers Ty Segall and Willis Earl Beal impressed both Jim and Greg with their intensely heartfelt performances, headlining sets by established artists like Feist and Vampire Weekend made them wonder if Pitchfork is losing its edge.

Rock lost a great organist and keyboard player Monday. Jon Lord of hard rock group Deep Purple is dead at age 71. A country boy from Leicester, Lord founded Deep Purple in London in 1968 with the goal of fusing his classical piano training with American R&B and blues. This he accomplished by plugging his Hammond organ into a giant Marshall stack. The distinctive growl of that Hammond became a trademark of the band's super heavy sound (a sound Greg credits with paving the way for metal). In remembrance of Lord, Jim and Greg play the track "Highway Star," featuring a killer organ solo, from the band's 1972 album Machine Head 9.

Go to episode 347