Results for T-Rex

interviews

Tony Visconti

While the performer gets all the glory, sometimes it's the producer who shares the guts. This week Jim and Greg revisit their conversation with one of rock's great behind-the-scenes men, Tony Visconti. Visconti has worked with everyone from The Moody Blues to Alejandro Escovedo, but is primarily known for the albums did with glam rockers T. Rex and David Bowie. Visconti relays how he was lucky enough to meet both men shortly after moving from Brooklyn to the UK; both were relatively young and undiscovered. Marc Bolan of T. Rex was still performing hippy folk songs as a member of Tyrannosaurus Rex, and Bowie was beginning song writing but had no direction. Visconti established long-term relationships with both Bowie and Bolan and helped them carve out their identities. In fact, he was tapped to produce Bowie's latest release, The Next Day which Jim and Greg review below.

Go to episode 381

Tony Visconti

While the performer gets all the glory, sometimes it's the producer who shares the guts. This week Jim and Greg hear from anonther of rock's great behind-the-scenes men, Tony Visconti. Visconti has worked with everyone from The Moody Blues to Alejandro Escovedo, but is primarily known for the albums he did with glam rockers T. Rex and David Bowie. Visconti relays how he was lucky enough to meet both men shortly after moving from Brooklyn to the U.K.; both were relatively young and undiscovered. Marc Bolan of T. Rex was still performing hippy folk songs as a member of Tyrannosaurus Rex, and Bowie was beginning song writing but had no direction. Visconti established long-term relationships with both Bowie and Bolan and helped them carve out their identities. You'll hear Visconti discuss the making of such landmark albums as Electric Warrior and Heroes.

Go to episode 143

Johnny Marr

Johnny Marr is something of a serial collaborator. First, there's his most famous partnership: with Morrissey in The Smiths. Then there's Bernard Sumner, Billy Bragg, Bert Jansch, The Cribs and Modest Mouse. So perhaps we shouldn't be surprised that it took three decades for him to go solo. On The Messenger Marr isn't afraid to harken back to his Smiths sound. Mostly, he explains to Jimand Greg, he thought about all the fans he meets at shows (all but one fan). He admits that some of the lyrical content isn't that far from the songs he wrote as a lad, but lucky for us he was weened on great guitar pop from T. Rex. Greg asks Marr about the almost insane decision to quit The Smiths at the height of their fame. But he insists that the band wouldn‘t have lasted another two weeks; musically, they achieved everything they could. That’s not to diminish the band. He also credits them with inventing "indie."

Go to episode 399
classic album dissections
Electric Warrior (Remastered)Electric Warrior available on iTunes

T. Rex Electric Warrior

David Bowie gets all the glam rock credit. But real fans know the look and the sound go back to T. Rex's 1971 release Electric Warrior. Singer Marc Bolan shook off some of his“pixie dust”and hippy-dippy Tyrannosaurus Rex sound to create a glossy, sexy record full of humor, sadness and lots of electric guitar fuzz, not to mention his signature vibrato. Jim and Greg talk to the album's producer Tony Visconti about Electric Warrior's recording. They also highlight their favorite tracks: Jim went with "Rip Off," a song that is as silly as it is indignant. Greg chose "Cosmic Dancer," which he says illustrates Bolan's growth as well as Visconti's. And anyone who has ever watched Billy Elliot would agree.

Listen to more of Jim and Greg's conversation with Tony Visconti, including the making of David Bowie's "Heroes".

Go to episode 247
reviews
Ringleader of the Tormentors

Morrissey Ringleader of the Tormentors

Mythical. Mopey. Maudlin. Just some of the words used to describe that other Irish pop GodMorrissey. But after listening to his new album Ringleader of the Tormentors, you might have to add lustful to the mix. Morrissey has been famously celibate for a number of years, and that torment served him well. But now he not only admits to sexual trysts in Rome, but makes his own proclivities less ambiguous than in the past. The result gets a Burn It rating from both hosts, but for very different reasons. Jim finds Morrissey's lyrics as biting as ever, but is not impressed with his sonic decisions. Greg, on the other hand, believes a miserable Morrissey is a better Morrissey, but really appreciates the music, which was produced by former Bowie and T. Rex collaborator Tony Visconti.

JimGreg
Go to episode 20
SupernatureSupernature available on iTunes

Goldfrapp Supernature

Next up for review is Supernature by Goldfrapp. This is the third album from the British electro-pop duo whose inspirations range from Marlene Dietrich to T-Rex to Massive Attack. Greg was a huge fan of their 2002 release Felt Mountain. He is less enamored of this effort, however, and gives it a Trash It rating. Jim is slightly more kind, and recommends listeners Burn It.

JimGreg
Go to episode 15
dijs

Greg

“Tainted Love”Gloria Jones

This week, Greg dropped a quarter in the Desert Island Jukebox, and brought the heavy lumber. His choice was Gloria Jones's Tainted Love." That's right, Gloria Jones, not Soft Cell. Soft Cell covered this "Northern Soul" classic, and received loads of cash and airplay, but this version is where it all started. Greg also blew Jim's mind by informing him that Gloria was the wife of Marc Bolan, of T-Rex fame. Bolan died in a car crash, and Gloria was the driver in the car.

Go to episode 1