Results for The Black Eyed Peas

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The E.N.D. (The Energy Never Dies)The E.N.D. available on iTunes

The Black Eyed Peas The E.N.D.

The Black Eyed Peas are hard to miss these days. After releasing a slew of hit albums and singles, they are back with The E.N.D. and its hit song "Boom Boom Pow." Jim was concerned that Will.I.Am had lost his touch after producing a number of failures for other artists. But the self-professed fan is happy to hear that the raps and beats are as silly as ever. He calls The E.N.D. a great summer album and gives it a Buy It. Greg compares the songs on this record to other frothy hits like "Who Let the Dogs Out." He admits the bubblegum formula is successful, but would never want to listen to an entire Black Eyed Peas album. He gives The E.N.D. a Trash It.

JimGreg
Go to episode 185
The Beginning & The Best of The E.N.D.The Beginning available on iTunes

The Black Eyed Peas The Beginning

The Black Eyed Peas are one of the best selling artists of the past decade. And now they're starting over with The Beginning. But Jim and Greg can‘t see what’s new or better. Jim is an admitted Peas fan, but what he loves about them – the humor, the pop pleasure – is lost on this album. So is singer Fergie, who Jim imagines must be saving her best stuff for another solo release. It breaks his heart, but Jim gives The Beginning a Trash It rating. Greg never understood the appeal of the Black Eyed Peas, but admits their songs are appropriate for rousing crowds. On this record, though, rapper/producer will.i.am is more of a hack than ever. He gives sampling a bad name, and doesn‘t even bother with the hooks. Greg seconds Jim’s Trash It.

JimGreg
Go to episode 262
news

Music News

Only five months ago Apple purchased the online music site Lala.com, and now they‘ve announced it’s shutting down. While it was never clear that a streaming music model would fit into Apple's iTunes download model, they did spend more than $80 million, so it is a bit of a head-scratcher. As Jim and Greg explain, this move has prompted speculation that Apple will soon be launching its own streaming music site, and just wanted to get rid of its competition. Regardless, it's clear that soon we'll all have our head in the“clouds.”

Roger Waters, the bassist, lyricist and some might say“brains”of Pink Floyd, recently announced an upcoming tour marking the 30th anniversary of The Wall. He's now saying that fellow Floyd alum David Gilmour won‘t be along for the ride because he’s“completely uninterested.”It's clear now that we shouldn‘t be holding our breath for a Pink Floyd reunion, and according to Jim, maybe we shouldn’t want one. Syd Barrett and Rick Wright are both deceased, and there can be no Pink Floyd without them.

Black Eyed Peas

Just when you thought there would never be another blockbuster music group in the digital age, The Black Eyed Peas have come along with more proof to the contrary. Their song "I Gotta Feeling" just became the biggest selling digital track in history with more than 5.5 million downloads. Their 2009 track "Boom Boom Pow," is also in the top 5. As Rolling Stone asserts, this is the band of the moment, and they are doing it 21st century style-with lots of viral marketing, digital music sales and corporate sponsorships. Another 21st century force to be reckoned with is Lady Gaga. Her own video for "Telephone," has become a sensation, all while spawning a number of video viral copycats. The latest comes out of the 82nd airborne division in Afghanistan. Their version of“Telephone”has been viewed over 2 million times, and for Greg, it trumps the original.

Go to episode 232

Music News

Last week a federal jury concluded that 25-year-old college student Joel Tennenbaum must pay $675,000 - or $22,500 for each of the 30 songs he was found liable of infringing. He was the country's second RIAA file-sharing defendant to go before a jury; the other was Minnesotawoman Jammie Thomas-Rasset. She was ordered to pay even more–$1.92 million for the 24 songs she shared on Kazaa. Both of these cases have been high-profile, leading Jim, Gregand guest Nate Anderson of Ars Technica to wonder if the defendents are being made examples of, especially since the damages were so high. Adding to the media attention was Tennenbaum's lawyer, Charles Nesson of Harvard, who took this case as a celebre. Nesson tried to use a fair-use defense, but the judge in the case was having none of it. Tenenbaum plans to appeal, but otherwise has plans to file for bankruptcy.

Mariah Carey announced this week that she'll include an ad-packed mini magazine with her next release, Memoirs of an Imperfect Angel. The 34-page spread will include ads for Mariah's perfume, as well as other luxury brands and Mariah-centric content. And a version will be included in Elle Magazine. Jim and Greg wonder if commercials between songs are next?

Black Eyed Peas The Black Eyed Peas have been consistent hit-makers since bringing Fergie on in 2003. Now they are record breakers. With "Boom Boom Pow" and "I Gotta Feeling," they have the longest successive chart run in the history of Billboard. The last group to do this was Boyz II Men. The Black Eyed Peas are solidifying their status as the dominant force in commercial music today.

Sun Records recording artist Billy Lee Riley died last week at the age of 75. Riley never achieved great mainstream success and didn't get to record a full album for Sun, but his string of singles were hugely influential according to Jim and Greg. The best way to remember him is by listening to his biggest hit "Flyin' Saucers Rock and Roll."

Go to episode 193

Music News

First up in the news is Billboard's annual list of the year's biggest money makers in the music industry. The chart magazine compiled the list using CD and digital sales, publishing royalties and touring. And while most of the artists at the top still sell records, the majority made the cut because of their hugely successful blockbuster tours. At #1 is U2, who raked in more than $108 million in 2009, mostly through their gigantic 360-degree tour. The band is followed by Bruce Springsteen and Madonna, though a number of younger acts also made the cut including The Jonas Brothers and Taylor Swift. Two glaring omissions: Beyonce and The Black Eyed Peas, neither of whom toured in 2009.

In more Billboard news, Sade is at the top of the charts for the third week in a row with her new release Soldier of Love. She's sold more than 800,000 records. Jim and Greg were interested to see so many adult-skewing artists on the charts, including Johnny Cash and Susan Boyle. It's the older consumers who are continuing to purchase physical product. However, they note that these sales numbers wouldn't have gotten an artist into the Top 50 ten years ago.

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Go to episode 223

Music News

Susan Boye Last week Jim and Greg reviewed the new album by The Black Eyed Peas, and this week they were sure it would be a #1 hit. But if there's anyone that can give the Peas a run for their money, it's…Susan Boyle? The Britain's Got Talent winner is the top seller of the week with her new album The Gift, beating out not only The Black Eyed Peas, but Kanye West and Taylor Swift. This news is further evidence that the physical album chart is dominated by people who still buy physical albums, a.k.a.“older folks.”Which leads to the next story…

Billboard has recognized that its standard album chart might not be a fully accurate representation of what's“popular”in music. In today's world, an artist's tweets, followers, fans, friends and hits are just as important indicators as record sales. So with that in mind they've launched the new Social 50. At the top of Social 50 are artists like Rihanna, Justin Bieber, Eminem and Nicki Minaj – all performers who sell records. But the chart also has the potential to recognize non-traditional acts like Widespread Panic, Girl Talk and Robyn, who consistently sell out shows, but don't have a big retail presence. Jim and Greg welcome Billboard to the 21st century.

Still shopping for holiday gifts and got a few thousand to spare? Well, you could get your loved one the original lyrics to Bob Dylan's song "The Times They Are a-Changin." And by a few thousand we mean $300,000. That's how much the sheet of unruled notebook paper is expected to go for at an upcoming auction. December certainly seems to be the month of rock memorabilia sales. Johnny Cash's jumpsuit, which he wore during his concert at San Quentin and made famous in this image, went for $50,000. Michael Jackson's glove sold for $300,000, and a decades old legal letter featuring John Lennon's original lyrics to "I'm Only Sleeping" is expected to go for over $500,000.

Go to episode 263