Results for Sun Studios

interviews

Peter Guralnick on Sam Phillips & Sun Studios

Samphillipsbook Peter Guralnick has written extensively about American music for decades including a two-part biography on Elvis Presley, the biography Searching for Robert Johnson and an acclaimed trilogy on American roots music. Now he's back with a comprehensive look at Sam Phillips called The Man Who Invented Rock ‘n’ Roll: How One Man Discoverd Howlin' Wolf, Ike Turner, Jerry Lee Lewis, Johnny Cash and Elvis Presley and How His Tiny Label Sun Records of Memphis, Revolutionized the World. If Sam Phillips, Sun Studios or Sun Records are new names to you, Peter wants to take you back to 1950s and 60s for what many historians call the birth of rock ‘n’ roll. Sun was home to black and white artists of the era who were merging genres like country, gospel, and R&B in ways unthinkable at the time. And that kind of freedom of spirit and enthusiasm, in addition to the idea that everybody has a song to sing, were the tenants of the Sun sound, even more than sonic hallmarks like "slapback echo."

Go to episode 523

Margo Price

Margo Price is part of a new generation on the Nashville scene that infuse authentic country roots with strong songwriting chops. Her first album, Midwest Farmer's Daughter was recorded at the famous Sun Studios in Memphis, and released by Jack White's Third Man Records in 2016. Her latest, 2017's All American Made, encompasses a variety of American roots genres, including outlaw country and soul, but she's quick to distance herself from ther current trend towards Americana music, noting that“There's a lot of people in the mainstream that are being turned on their heads right now, and really grasping for authenticity. I think it's only a matter of time before the Americana/Outlaw bubble bursts.”Price joined Jim and Greg for an interview and performance at the Goose Island Barrelhouse in Chicago.

Go to episode 655
specials

Summer Road Trip

What better way to round out the summer than with a Sound Opinions (virtual) summer road trip. Too often, New York, L.A. and Nashville get all the music industry attention. But, there are great rock scenes all across the country, so this week Jim and Greg check in with insiders in three music towns coast-to-coast. They talk to Sam Sessa, an entertainment writer for the Baltimore Sun and the host of WTMD's Balitmore Unsigned, Bob Mehr, a music critic at Memphis' Commercial Appeal and Casey Jarman, the music editor at Portland's weekly newspaper the Willamette Week.

Check out these local acts-old favorites and new ones recommended by our city guides.

Go to episode 248
reviews
No Better Than This - SingleNo Better Than This available on iTunes

John Mellencamp No Better Than This

For his new album No Better Than This, John Mellencamp teamed up with veteran producer T. Bone Burnett. He and Burnett recorded in three iconic locations: First African Baptist Church in Savannah, Sun Studios in Memphis and the Gunter Hotel in San Antonio. But Jim thinks they might have been better off staying put. He doesn't like the sound, nor does he appreciate the lack of humor. Jim gives this“pile of cow dung”a Trash It. Greg can't believe it. Not only does he love the loose songwriting, he heard a lot of humor, and tells people to Buy It.

JimGreg
Go to episode 247
dijs

Greg

“Ring of Fire”Johnny Cash

For his Desert Island Jukebox selection, Greg celebrates the musical legacy of Cowboy Jack Clement, the country music producer, songwriter, and artist who died recenly at age 82. Jack made his name at Memphis's Sun Studios during the 1950's, recording greats like Jerry Lee Lewis. But it was at Columbia that he helped craft Johnny Cash's inimitable "Ring of Fire." The night before the“Ring of Fire”recording session, Cash had a dream about Mariachi trumpets. And he knew just who to turn to make that dream a reality. Greg credits Clement's horn riff on“Ring of Fire”with the track's enduring energy and distinctiveness.

Go to episode 403
news

Music News

Pinetop Perkins Blues piano player Pinetop Perkins passed away this week at age 97. He was one of the last links to the Mississippi Delta blues era. As Greg relays, Perkins made his mark as a sideman for people like Muddy Waters. It wasn't until he was 75 that he released an album under his own name. He even holds the record for oldest Grammy winner. Pinetop Perkins was going strong right up until his death, so to honor him, Jim and Greg play the song that gave him his name, "Pinetop's Boogie Woogie," recorded at Sun Studios in 1953.

Go to episode 278