Results for Ride

specials

Shoegaze Genre Dissection

Slowdive In the late '80s and early '90s, Shoegaze developed in the U.K. and was typified by lots of guitar, lots of atmosphere and lots of noise. But while the height of Shoegaze only lasted a few years, its influence looms large today. As Jim and Greg explain, the artists of this movement were students of rock history. They looked at the guitar as something more than a traditional blues instrument. Those hunks of wire and wood could act as a sound machine. And evidently that machine and all the effects pedals that modified the sound required constant attention: instead of dancing, preening or stage diving the bands stood still and looked down at their feet while on stage- hence the originally derisive intent behind the name“shoegaze.”You can trace a line from bands like The Velvet Underground and Dinosaur Jr. to key Shoegaze bands like My Bloody Valentine, Lush, Ride and Slowdive. And their desire to marry rock drive with otherworldly ambience is what carries the genre into the present moment when new bands all over the globe keep coming together to play this style of music.

Go to episode 697
genre dissections

Shoegaze

Today Jim and Greg dive into "Shoegaze." In the late '80s and early '90s, this sound developed in the U.K. and was typified by lots of guitar, lots of atmosphere and lots of noise. But while the height of Shoegaze only lasted a few years, its influence looms large today. As Jim and Greg explain, the artists of this movement were students of rock history. They looked at the guitar as something more than a traditional blues instrument. Those hunks of wire and wood could act as a sound machine. You can trace a line from bands like The Velvet Underground and Dinosaur Jr. to key Shoegaze bands like My Bloody Valentine, Lush, Ride and Slowdive. And their desire to marry rock drive with otherworldly ambience is what carries the genre into the present moment. It's also important to note that while the term“shoegazer”began as derisive-musicians staring at their shoes are no fun to watch-seeing these acts live was really a special, albeit loud, experience.

Go to episode 371
dijs

Jim

“Vapour Trail”Ride

One release Jim is excited about this fall is a reissue of the debut album by Ride called Nowhere. So he chooses a track from it, "Vapour Trail" to add to the Desert Island Jukebox. Along with My Bloody Valentine, Ride established the groundbreaking shoegaze sound, proving that it is possible to do something new with guitar, bass and drums. And Jim puts Nowhere up there with Nevermind, even if it never received the same kind of acclaim.

Go to episode 249

Greg

“I Don't Know Why I Love You”The House of Love

A band Greg highlighted earlier in the show, The Soft Science, released a cover of The House of Love's 1989 single "I Don't Know Why I Love You" as a B-side in April. For this spin on the Desert Island Jukebox, Greg's playing the original. He says that The House of Love was a victim of bad timing, coming after The Smiths, but before the Britpop boom. The song "I Don't Know Why I Love You" came on their second self-titled album. That session was their first for a major label and took more than two years and four producers to complete. Band members said new pressure to create hits caused tension within the band. The album's first single and some remixes were released against the band's will, adding to the trouble. Eventually guitarist Terry Bickers was kicked out of the band just a few days into the album's promotional tour. Still, Greg says the album is full of singles that hold up, even almost 30 years later. He points out similarities in the sound of Ride and The Stone Roses as evidence of The House of Love's influence.

Go to episode 659