Results for Poison

interviews

Mark Anthony Neal and Joan Morgan

Next Jim and Greg welcome Mark Anthony Neal, a professor of Black Popular Culture at Duke University and author of New Black Man: Rethinking Black Masculinity, and Joan Morgan, a writer and critic who recently left her post as Executive Editor of Essence Magazine. Joan and Mark have been debating the merits and demerits of hip hop since they grew up as friends and neighbors in "Boogie Down Bronx." And Joan was one of the first music critics to examine the dichotomy of hip hop fandom and feminism in her 1990 Village Voice review of Ice Cube's first classic album AmeriKKKa's Most Wanted. Greg asks Joan what she makes of misogyny in modern hip hop. She explains that it was always there, but the level of it has changed. That concept of women has consumed commercial rap music, so listeners don‘t hear a lot of balance in perspective and tone. She also explains that something like the Ice Cube album is actually easier to wrestle with because it’s a brilliant album. Joan and Mark explain that labels are as complicit as artists in perpetuating a certain level of misogyny since they are the ones actually limiting the range of what you hear in hip hop.

Greg wonders if perhaps the consumer has already begun to speak out. Last year's top hip hop act, T.I., sold 1.7 million copies of his album King. Those aren‘t paltry figures to be sure, but they are definitely much smaller than what we’ve seen from star rappers in years past. Mark sees less revenue and less investment in major-label hip hop as a good thing; it's an opportunity for fresher sounds to come into the marketplace. Jim likens the trend to the development of indie rock in the '80s. That market was also glutted with big name acts like Poison and Mötley Crüe, leaving music fans to seek out underground rock from bands like Hüsker Dü and The Minutemen. Perhaps next we'll enter into an era of indie hip hop.

When asked about the effectiveness of banning certain words in hip hop music, Joan first expresses disappointment in what came out of Simmons and the Hip Hop Summit Action Network's meetings. Without doubting Simmons‘ sincerity, she calls the resulting call to action anemic at best and disingenuous at worst. Mark also grates against people, especially members of the“old guard,”making proclamations about culture or language. This kind of criticism is compounded by the fact that critics of rap music often don’t understand aesthetics. Mark's specific example is the hit hip hop single "In Da Club." People that take issue with the shallow nature of 50 Cent's lyrics may be failing to hear what makes a song like that so popular — the production and the beats. Mark furthers that rulings against specific words don't take into consideration that some rappers can make really complex, compelling statements using racial or sexist epithets. Joan adds that you can also say some really sexist, racist and homophobic things without using any“bad words”at all.

Go to episode 82

Ex Hex

Ex Hex is a trio who celebrate guitar rock, even 1980s albums by bands like Def Leppard and Poison, which is surprising if you consider the indie rock scene from which they sprang. Mary Timony was the singer and guitarist of Helium for much of the 1990s and before that the short-lived Autoclave. Both were groups that could almost be considered the exact opposite of arena rock. But, as she tells Jim and Greg, Timony heard bands like Van Halen with fresh ears when working as a guitar teacher after quitting music in her mid-30s. Students would ask to learn classic rock songs and in order to teach them, Timony would learn them, too. When members of Sleater Kinney and The Minders asked her to join the supergroup Wild Flag in 2010, she brought her new knowledge of guitar shredding with her: rolling on the floor and doing windmill guitar moves frequently while on tour.

When Wild Flag split up before doing a second album, Timony took the songs she'd already started and formed Ex Hex with Betsy Wright of Bat Fangs and drummer Laura Harris. Ex Hex takes that guitar hero aspect and turns it up to eleven. On their second album, It's Real, Ex Hex seems to be fully committed to this approach to music that would have been so at odds with Timony's early work. As our audience at the Goose Island Tap Room knows, the band is more concerned with making good, fun music than expressing deep angst.

Go to episode 705
lists

Guilty Pleasures

Even professional rock critics like Jim and Greg are occasionally guilty of musical crimes. So this week, they come clean and admit to liking some music that they should know better than to enjoy. Whether these songs are actually bad, or just really un-cool, Jim and Greg stand by their Guilty Pleasures. A few of you brave listeners also made confessions. We at Sound Opinions absolve you for these sins.

Go to episode 41