Results for Play

interviews

Moby

Moby – who first appeared on the show in 2006 – arrived in New York City in the late '80s as a sober Christian vegan making his way through the nascent underground club scene. A decade later, he was the public face of techno, selling 10 million copies of his album Play and living a life of excess. He's written all about his early career in a new memoir Porcelain, a book Jim compares to Charles Mingus's Beneath the Underdog as one of the great musical autobiographies.

This week Moby speaks with Jim and Greg about the gritty but exuberant heyday of rave culture and house music – and how quickly it all ended. After a string of club hits, Moby confused some critics with the eclectic 1995 album Everything is Wrong, and alienated just about everybody with the hardcore punk-inspired Animal Rights in 1996. But 1999's Play was an unprecedented smash, which led, as Moby explains, to the traditional rise-and-fall story arc of fame and decadence.

Go to episode 556

Titus Andronicus

The members of Titus Andronicus named their band after a Shakespeare play, their first album after a Seinfeld reference, and the latest called The Monitor was influenced by the Civil War. Needless to say this isn't your average punk band. During their visit to Sound Opinions, lead singer Patrick Stickles talks to Jim and Greg about his book smart lyrics and New Jersey roots. They also perform live.

Go to episode 284

Moby

Moby – who first appeared on the show in 2006 – arrived in New York City in the late '80s as a sober Christian vegan making his way through the nascent underground club scene. A decade later, he was the public face of techno, selling 10 million copies of his album Play and living a life of excess. He wrote all about his early career in his first memoir Porcelain, a book Jim compared to Charles Mingus's Beneath the Underdog as one of the great musical autobiographies. Now his second memoir, Then It Fell Apart is due out soon.

This week Moby speaks with Jim and Greg about the gritty but exuberant heyday of rave culture and house music – and how quickly it all ended. After a string of club hits, Moby confused some critics with the eclectic 1995 album Everything is Wrong, and alienated just about everybody with the hardcore punk-inspired Animal Rights in 1996. But 1999's Play was an unprecedented smash, which led, as Moby explains, to the traditional rise-and-fall story arc of fame and decadence.

Go to episode 699
reviews
Wait For MeWait for Me available on iTunes

Moby Wait for Me

Moby has a new album out called Wait for Me. The musician has spent a decade trying to follow up the success of his 1999 album Play. And if his last record was a night out on the town, this is the comedown for Greg. He recorded it at home, and you can hear that sense of isolation. Greg's only quibble is the length, so he gives it a Buy It. Jim agrees. He hears the newly independent artist connecting with his roots, again taking inspiration from David Lynch. Moby gets a double Buy It.

JimGreg
Go to episode 190
Last NightPlay available on iTunes

Moby Play

Moby had one of the biggest selling albums of all time with 1999's Play, and now he's back with his eighth proper album Last Night. Jim and Greg describe the record as a one night tour of the New York underbelly. The music illustrates Moby's return to his disco roots, and as Greg discusses, the electronic artist really understands the drama in dance music, as well as the spirituality. He explains that between the beautiful melodies, emotion and beats, Last Night is a terrific album beginning to end. Jim has never been shy about being a Moby fan. He appreciates how the artist has never tried to be“cool”and how he has such an“old-school”appreciation of melody. As much as they hate to do it, both Jim and Greg agree and give Moby's new album a double Buy It.

JimGreg
Go to episode 123