Results for outlaw country

interviews

Margo Price

Margo Price is part of a new generation on the Nashville scene that infuse authentic country roots with strong songwriting chops. Her first album, Midwest Farmer's Daughter was recorded at the famous Sun Studios in Memphis, and released by Jack White's Third Man Records in 2016. Her latest, 2017's All American Made, encompasses a variety of American roots genres, including outlaw country and soul, but she's quick to distance herself from ther current trend towards Americana music, noting that“There's a lot of people in the mainstream that are being turned on their heads right now, and really grasping for authenticity. I think it's only a matter of time before the Americana/Outlaw bubble bursts.”Price joined Jim and Greg for an interview and performance at the Goose Island Barrelhouse in Chicago.

Go to episode 655

Steve Earle

Singer/songwriter is no longer sufficient enough to describe the artistic output of Steve Earle. The novelist, playwright, actor, activist AND singer/songwriter has released his 16th studio album, So You Wannabe An Outlaw. The record is a return to the outlaw country sound he cut his teeth on, recording most of it on a 1955 Fender Telecaster while "shamelessly channeling Waylon Jennings." Steve joined Jim and Greg at the Goose Island Tap Room in Chicago to perform a solo acoustic set and talk about his craft.“I realized that's what the job is…it's how we're the same, not how we're different…it's the universal things in these songs,”says Steve of his job as a songwriter. In their wide ranging interview, Jim and Greg talk with Steve about finding empathy in political songs, balancing life while on tour, the research that goes into his songs, and which cities have the best Mexican food (sorry, Austin).

Go to episode 611
dijs

Greg

“Irma Jackson”Merle Haggard

When outlaw country legend Merle Haggard died in April of this year, many obituaries focused on his huge 1969 hit "Okie From Muskogee." It was a divisive song from a contentious time in U.S. history. Many took it as a flag-waving anthem that mocked the counterculture. Haggard himself changed his tune many times regarding whether he personally agreed with the lyrics or not. What Greg finds interesting is that the single Haggard wanted to put out following“Okie From Muskogee”was "Irma Jackson," a song in defense of interracial romance. The record company“suits”wouldn‘t release it, believing it would alienate his new fans. Three years later, Haggard finally got his way and the single was released. Greg believes Haggard was finally able to show that he was much more than the one-dimensional character in“Okie.”And that’s why he selected“Irma Jackson”to take to the Desert Island Jukebox today.

Go to episode 551