Results for *N Sync

specials

The Monkees

Hey, hey, it's The Monkees! Jim and Greg go ape on this episode with Eric Lefcowitz, author of Monkee Business: The Revolutionary Made For TV Band. The three men talk about the band's history as a group manufactured to tap into Beatlemania. TV producers Bob Rafelson and Bert Schneider brought bandmates Micky Dolenz, Michael Nesmith, Peter Tork and Davy Jones together, and their music was supervised by record producer Don Kirshner. This was the original pop model, giving way to NSYNC, Justin Bieber and Glee. But eventually, as often happens, The Monkees began to itch for independence. They went on to write and produce more of their own music and make the trippy cult classic Head. But for those who want to relive the golden age, rumor has it The Monkees will be“reuniting”(sans Nesmith) this year.

Go to episode 273

The Monkees

Hey, hey it's The Monkees! Jim and Greg go ape on this episode with Eric Lefcowitz, author of Monkee Business: The Revolutionary Made For TV Band. Monkees teen icon Davy Jones died last week at age 66, and so Jim and Greg return to this 2011 conversation. The three men talk about the band's history as a group manufactured to tap into Beatlemania. TV producers Bob Rafelson and Bert Schneider brought bandmates Micky Dolenz, Michael Nesmith, Peter Tork and Davy Jones together, and their music was supervised by record producer Don Kirshner. This was the original pop model, giving way to N'Sync, Justin Bieber and Glee. But eventually, as often happens, The Monkees began to itch for independence. They went on to write and produce more of their own music and make the trippy cult classic Head. And of course, there were a number of reunion efforts in later decades. But, for many their legacy remains those wacky TV moments and classic pop songs.

Go to episode 328
reviews
The 20/20 Experience – 2 of 2The 20/20 Experience 2 of 2 available on iTunes

Justin Timberlake The 20/20 Experience 2 of 2

This fall is seeing a slew of big new records. First up to bat is Justin Timberlake with The 20/20 Experience 2 of 2. The triple threat has teamed up with one of the producers who helped him make his post-N'Sync debut: Timbaland. But, this time the results are mixed. Jim finds the music lacking punch and wishes the BPM's were upped a bit. He says Trash It. Greg agrees the music needs more pep, but found a few songs worth saving. He goes with a Burn It for JT.

JimGreg
Go to episode 410
FutureSex/LoveSoundsFutureSex/LoveSounds available on iTunes

Justin Timberlake FutureSex/LoveSounds

The final bit of news is the release of Justin Timberlake's second solo album, FutureSex/LoveSounds. The ex-teen heartthrob is all grown up and has aligned himself with producer Timbaland, as well as Rick Rubin and will.i.am, for a darker, more cutting-edge — and yes, sexier — sound than 'N Sync fans are used to. He's also launched an impressive live show that has the charismatic singer fronting an 11-piece band. It's just one of many adventurous moves that are impressing our hosts. Jim explains that with the exception of one bum track which tells the sad story of“a life ruined by meth addiction,”the diverse array of songs on FutureSex/LoveSounds all succeed. He gives it a Buy It rating. Greg agrees, explaining that the songs are fairly avant-garde and hook-less for a pop record. He does not think Timberlake is the best singer in the world, but he pulls off dance music as well as old-school soul. He also gives the album a Buy It. (By the way, Timberlake is not the only former Mouseketeer“dropping”a project this week. We want to extend hearty congratulations to his former girlfriend, Britney Spears, now the mom of two.)

JimGreg
Go to episode 42
A Little Bit LongerA Little Bit Longer available on iTunes

Jonas Brothers A Little Bit Longer

Disney is cashing in big yet again with another group of stylish, singing kids. The Jonas Brothers' new album A Little Bit Longer sold over 500,000 albums in its first week. They're also the first group since N'SYNC to have two albums in the Billboard top ten list in the same week (the other album being their self-titled release). Greg is impressed by Disney's marketing machine, but now understands that all it takes to sell records is cute boys. He doesn't think the album is very good, calling it“mild-mannered”and“chaste.”Jim doesn‘t like it either, but isn’t sold on the chastity. He thinks that "BB Good" is seedier than it appears and is also aggravated by the group's bombastic, Broadway-inspired singing style. He gives it a Trash It. Greg doesn‘t buy into Jim’s theory about a darker Jonas Brothers subtext, but also gives the album a Trash It.

JimGreg
Go to episode 143
2525 available on iTunes

Adele 25

Pop powerhouse Adele recently made her highly anticipated return to music with her third album 25. In typical Adele fashion, she ended up selling almost 3.4 million copies of 25 in one week, breaking a previous record held by NSYNC's 2000 album No Strings Attached. Something else noteworthy about this new record is that is was produced by the biggest names in music, with songs by Ryan Tedder, Max Martin, Greg Kurstin and Bruno Mars. Greg has to admit that he is disappointed with the album. While he enjoyed songs like "Million Years" and "Miss You," he thought Adele could have challenged herself more. Greg isn‘t hearing any new terrain being mined, and even though Adele has moved on in real life from that infamous relationship, musically she’s still "living in 21 land." He gives 25 a Try It. Jim is far more incensed because he was a big fan of Adele's first album, 19. The lyrics are beneath her. And without more interesting, unique songs, he has to say Trash It.

JimGreg
Go to episode 523
lists

Going Solo

Paul McCartney solo Paul McCartney released his first post-Beatles album 45 years ago this month, launching a commercially successful solo career that is still going strong. Sometimes members of a famous band go out on their own and fall flat on their faces. But in this segment, Jim and Greg share examples of artists going solo and living up to expectations.

Go to episode 490
news

Music News

Web developers have finally created a way for iPhone and iPod Touch users to share files. Similar to the p2p file-sharing program Soulseek, iSlsk allows fans of the Apple phone to wirelessly swap music at fairly high speeds. This news comes just months prior to the release of the highly anticipated new 3G iPhone. While consumers are waiting, Steve Jobs is working to extend Apple's lead in online music sales to the mobile market. Jobs would like to get into the ringtones and ringbacks business, but in order to do so he may have to work out a deal with record labels. According to speculation, Jobs may agree to a variable pricing plan in exchange for mobile delivery. Now we'll have to see if digital music consumers are willing to give up low prices for convenience. We predict they will.

Boy band mogul Lou Pearlman was sentenced to 25 years in prison for swindling investors and major U.S. banks out of more than $300 million. Pearlman made his mark in the music industry after launching the careers of *N Sync and The Backstreet Boys. Pearlman's legal team was looking for more leniency, but Jim and Greg don't think the judge was harsh enough. Jim would tack on a few more years just for kicking off the boy band craze.

Earlier this year rapper Nas raised eyebrows after announcing plans to call his upcoming album "N*gger." He saw it as a way to re-appropriate the word in a positive way. But now, the hip hop artist has decided to remove the provocative word from his release. Nas has suggested that he received pressure from his label to give the album a more retail-friendly title, but both Jim and Greg smell a publicity stunt.

Go to episode 130

Music News

First in the news, Jim and Greg discuss a story emerging out of the next decade. They talk to Wired writer Eliot Van Buskirk about his recent piece on the "Copyright Time Bomb." As Eliot explains to Jim and Greg, the U.S. Copyright Act of 1976 poses a new threat to the major label system. Songs copyrighted after 1978 can be terminated by the author in 2013 (1979 in 2014, etc.) That means that if a musician sold his or her work to a label after 1978, they can choose to take it back and manage it independently in the next decade. Many labels rely on back cataloge revenue, so this will be a big hit to them. In addition, it may be another reason an artist chooses to go it independently and without a label.

Jim and Greg couldn't welcome 2010 without looking at the decade past. The 2000s brought us N'Sync and the boy band explosion, but they also ushered in great change in terms of business and technology. As Jim and Greg discuss, advances in digital music were at the heart of all the decade's major news-from lawsuits (Metallica vs. Napster, RIAA vs. consumers) to innovation in sound, marketing and distribution (Wilco, Radiohead, Nine Inch Nails). And while the Aughts were a time of industry revolution, there wasn't necessarily a revolutionary sound. Jim thinks people may have been too shocked by technology to create something comparable to a punk, disco or grunge movement. But he and Greg are hopeful that something great is just waiting to come out of a basement near you.

Go to episode 214