Results for New York Dolls

interviews

Robyn Hitchcock, Peter Buck, and Scott McCaughey

Robyn Hitchcock, the man who Jim and Greg call a cross between Bob Dylan and Syd Barrett, visits the show this week. He is joined by his Venus 3 band mates, Peter Buck and Scott McCaughey, whose day jobs as members of R.E.M. aren‘t too shabby. All of the band members share a deep love of music, and a history of finding inspiration in record stores. Peter and Scott explain that this is how they initially became familiar with Robyn’s music. Greg remarks that they're all just a buncha rock geeks — our kind of guys!

Robyn and the Venus 3 have a new album out entitled Olé! Tarantula. According to Jim, it's a return to an earlier Hitchcock sound full of jangly melodies and multiple harmonies. And of course, you can count on the singer/songwriter for inventive lyrics. Sound Opinions H.Q. won't attempt to summarize his explanation of the concept behind Olé! Tarantula and the album's artwork, but offers this and this as reference points. You can hear the band perform this song, as well as "Adventure Rocket Ship," Syd Barrett's "Dominoes", and the bonus track, "N.Y. Doll" written about deceased New York Dolls member Arthur Kane.

Jim and Greg don‘t neglect to ask Peter Buck about his other gig. The R.E.M. guitarist and songwriter explains that he has written a lot of material and hopes to get together with some of the other band members soon to work on songs for their next album. Ideally he’d like to avoid spending“a lifetime.”An example of the band's more immediate work is the song "Final Straw." Buck wrote that piece of music while they were working on Automatic for the People, but he continued it to use it as a guitar warm-up. Lead singer Michael Stipe was struck by the tune and inspired by in the Middle East, and within a day it was recorded and put on the web.

Go to episode 59
classic album dissections
Exile On Main St. (Deluxe Edition)Exile on Main St. available on iTunes

The Rolling Stones Exile on Main St.

Jim and Greg offer up a classic album dissection for Exile on Main St. by The Rolling Stones, a recording that's still shrouded in mystique over 45 years later. Jim says that even after loving this album for decades,“he has yet to plumb the surface”of the double album. He adds, that the genre-blurring album reflects“the American music canon, the weirder things in Grandma's attic.”

Exile on Main St. is the band's 10th studio album. In many ways, its dark, murky sound makes it a bit of an outlier in their extensive catalog. That often imitated sound was a product of being recorded in the basement of Keith Richards's villa in France. Jim and Greg explore the recording process, the sound and the infuence on what Greg calls“The Post-Exile generations”from the New York Dolls to the White Stripes.

Go to episode 644
reviews
One Day It Will Please Us to Remember Even ThisOne Day It Will Please Us to Remember Even This available on iTunes

New York Dolls One Day It Will Please Us to Remember Even This

After disbanding over 30 years ago, glam punk legends the New York Dolls are back with a new album, One Day It Will Please Us to Remember Even This. Though the band's first incarnation existed for only a few years, its influence is undeniable. As Jim and Greg explain, without the Dolls, we wouldn't have the Sex Pistols. Heck, we may not even have had Morrissey, who got the Dolls together in 2004 for London's Meltown Festival. The sole surviving Dolls, David Johansen (aka "Buster Poindexter") and Sylvain Sylvain, came together for this album. Upon hearing of this latest effort, Jim and Greg were both excited and fearful. Now, after hearing it, they can say that their worries were not in vain. Jim loves the old Dolls, and can't understand how the band that made One Day It Will Please Us can even call themselves the New York Dolls. For Jim, it's a Trash It. Greg is a little more forgiving. He thinks that the 2006 Dolls come off like a pretty good cover band, and can't completely bash them. He gives the album a Burn It rating.

JimGreg
Go to episode 35
dijs

Greg

“Personality Crisis”New York Dolls

Jim and Greg sail away to the Desert Island Jukebox, and it's Greg's turn to choose a song. He wants to return to the high point of the New York Dolls. They're still making music today, but it's nothing Jim and Greg want to remember. Greg goes back to 1973's "Personality Crisis," which showcases what was so amazing about the Dolls: Johnny Thunder's guitar, Syl Sylvain's pop smarts, and David Johansen's charisma. People called the group "glam," but Greg credits them as the 1st punk band, giving way to the Sex Pistols.

Go to episode 293

Jim

“Frenchette”The New York Dolls

In order to remove the bad taste left by the New York Dolls' recent showing, Jim decides to return to a happier time with this week's Desert Island Jukebox pick. Even after the Dolls broke up, lead singer David Johansen never failed to deliver — especially live, as Jim found out after attending a 1982 show (illegally). The then-underage critic was mesmerized by Johansen's energetic performance of songs like this week's DIJ track, "Frenchette." While most of the Dolls' songs were short, classic punk tunes,“Frenchette”clocks in at over five minutes and is more in tune with the stadium anthems of the era. The song is a witty play on the notion of something being not quite what it should: not love, but lovette; not leather, but leatherette; not French, but Frenchette. The song was written by Johansen and fellow Doll Sylvain Sylvain. This proves that the two men were capable of doing great work post-Dolls, prompting Jim to wonder why they can't create the same magic today. Both Jim and Greg put out an open invitation for the Dolls to come get some medicine from the rock doctors.

Go to episode 35

Jim

“Chinese Rocks”The Heartbreakers,The Heartbreakers,The Heartbreakers

Jim noted that 20 years ago on April 23, 1991, Johnny Thunders died. The former New York Doll sadly became as famous for his bad heroin habit as he was for his music. So, Jim uses his turn at the Desert Island Jukebox to remember the music. He plays a song about addiction, "Chinese Rocks," which was written by fellow punk legends Dee Dee Ramone and Richard Hell, and performed by Thunders and his band The Heartbreakers in 1977.

Go to episode 282
lists

Halloween Monster Songs

Every Halloween Jim and Greg like to celebrate with music. And this year they focused on monsters. From vampires to werewolves to Jim's favorite, zombies, here are a selection of tunes for your next monster bash.

Go to episode 361