Results for Massive Attack

specials

1991

It's hard to believe, but it has now been two decades since 1991, a year Jim and Greg believe to be as influential and significant as 1964, 1976 and other great rock years. 1991's artists, albums and events made way for big changes in the music industry, and the sounds of that year continue to be referenced today. Just look at recent guests Teenage Fanclub and Superchunk, who both released major albums in 1991 and are still filling our playlists in 2011. While Bryan Adams and Garth Brooks topped the charts, they don't tell the true story of this year. For Jim and Greg, 1991 was all about:

  • Nirvana and the birth of grunge
  • My Bloody Valentine and the growth of shoegaze
  • Lollapalooza and the rise of the Alternative Nation
  • N.W.A. and the reign of gangsta rap
  • Massive Attack and the birth of trip-hop
Go to episode 270

Revisiting 1991

1991

Though it seems like just yesterday for many, it's been 25 years since 1991. Along with 1964, '67 and '76, 1991 was a landmark year for music. You can hear its influence everywhere from neo-grunge band Bully to Compton rapper Kendrick Lamar. While Bryan Adams and Garth Brooks topped the charts, there are even more musicians that made groundbreaking strides back in '91. For Jim and Greg, 1991 was all about:

  • Nirvana and the birth of grunge
  • My Bloody Valentine and the growth of shoegaze
  • Lollapalooza and the rise of the Alternative Nation
  • N.W.A. and the reign of gangsta rap
  • Massive Attack and the birth of trip-hop
Go to episode 538
reviews
SupernatureSupernature available on iTunes

Goldfrapp Supernature

Next up for review is Supernature by Goldfrapp. This is the third album from the British electro-pop duo whose inspirations range from Marlene Dietrich to T-Rex to Massive Attack. Greg was a huge fan of their 2002 release Felt Mountain. He is less enamored of this effort, however, and gives it a Trash It rating. Jim is slightly more kind, and recommends listeners Burn It.

JimGreg
Go to episode 15
Our Version of EventsOur Version of Events available on iTunes

Emeli Sande Our Version of Events

Not long ago, Scottish R&B singer Emeli Sande was studying neuroscience at Glasgow University. Writing and performing music was a side gig. That changed in 2009 when she hooked up with British hip-hop producer Naughty Boy and the two put out the successful single“Diamond Rings”with Chipmunk. It's been a swift rise for Sande ever since. After working as a songwriter for artists like Leona Lewis, Susan Boyle and Tinie Tempah, she's put out her first solo record, Our Version of Events, on a major label. So is Sande the next Adele as some in the British press have prophesied? Jim says not quite. While the quality of Sande's voice is undeniable, he's disturbed by the submissiveness in her lyrics (there's something uncomfortable, he says, about a 25-year-old woman referring to a lover as "daddy.") Sande's cited both Nina Simone and Massive Attack as influences, but when it comes to merging those sounds, Jim says Sande's got a ways to go. What social consciousness there is on this record is generic and uncompelling. Greg agrees. In trying to show Sande's breadth as a songwriter, he suspects her producers spread her too thin. Still, the voice is there, and Greg predicts Sande will go on to make better records than this one. Our Version of Events gets a double Burn It.

JimGreg
Go to episode 346
lists

James Brown's“The Payback”in hip-hop

  • Queen Latifah, "If You Don't Know"
  • LL Cool J, "The Boomin' System"
  • Mary J Blige, "Everything"
  • Ice Cube, "The Wrong Nigga to Fuck Wit"
  • Massive Attack, "Protection"
  • En Vogue, "(My Lovin‘) You’re Never Gonna Get It"

James Brown fans should also check out the articles written by Jim and Greg after his death.

Go to episode 57
news

Music News

Making news are recent announcements about upcoming summer concerts. First, there was release of the lineups for the annual Coachella and Bonnaroo music festivals. The Coachella Festival in southern California usually has one of the more exciting and diverse bills of the summer, with past headliners like Coldplay, Nine Inch Nails, and Radiohead. This year, though, Jim and Greg are skeptical of whether headliners Tool and Depeche Mode can be enough of a draw. It's up to support acts like the Yeah Yeah Yeahs, Massive Attack and Wolf Parade to make the desert heat bearable. There is also exciting news for Chicagoans: Lollapalooza will be returning with an expanded three-day format. Plus, indie rock fans can look forward to not one, but two new festivals in the city—the Pitchfork Music Festival and the newly independent Intonation Festival.

Joining Jim and Greg for the news this week is former Supreme Mary Wilson. Ms. Wilson made headlines recently when she began a national campaign to support legislation that would prevent imposters (but thankfully not cover bands) from posing as major artists. To prove the point that there is only one true Mary Wilson, the singer did an a cappella rendition of The Supremes' "Stop! In the Name of Love" for the Illinois House of Representatives.

Go to episode 12