Results for I Believe

dijs

Jim

“I Believe”Buzzcocks

Jim and Greg's choices for the Desert Island Jukebox are often influenced by current events or discussion in an episode. But this week, Jim just wanted to hear some Buzzcocks. Their album Singles Going Steady is one of the great compilation albums of all time. But the one great single that didn‘t make it on is the band’s 1979 song "I Believe." Is it a manifesto? Or just a joke? Jim doesn‘t know, but he’ll be happy listening over and over again.

Go to episode 182
obituarys

Pete Shelley of the Buzzcocks

Pete Shelley

Pete Shelley, the leader of the Buzzcocks, died at home in Estonia of a heart attack on December 6, 2018. He was 63 years old. Shelley's work was a major influence on a wide swath of musicians over the past 40 years. Greg points out the Buzzcocks were one of the first punk bands to eschew the safety pins and mohawks aesthetic, showing the movement ran deeper than fashion trends. He calls them "the next generation's answer to The Beatles." Shelley and Buzzcocks co-founder Howard Devoto put on the Sex Pistols' first show outside of London. It turned out to be a confluence of the future of Manchester's music scene with members of Joy Division and The Smiths in attendance as well as Factory Records founder Anthony Wilson and producer Martin Hannett. It was recreated in the 2002 film, "24 Hour Party People."

Jim points out the Buzzcocks' devotion to melody and describes their sound as“the Beatles catalog shoved into two minutes.”He also recounts how Shelley's first solo single "Homosapien" was banned by the BBC for“racy”lyrics. Fans have often wondered if Shelley's early embrace of synth-pop could have led to greater commercial success had the song been played on the radio. Jim plays "Ever Fallen In Love (With Someone You Shouldn‘t’ve)" as a tribute, calling it one of the greatest songs ever. Greg pays tribute by playing "I Believe," which Shelley closed many concert sets with and was an audience favorite.

Go to episode 682