Results for Elliott Smith

interviews

Jason Lytle

Jason Lytle, the man behind Grandaddy, joins Jim and Greg in the studio this week. Grandaddy has impressed our hosts for years with its folk-pop melodies and adventurous, atmospheric production. The band's recent release, Just Like the Fambly Cat, however, was their last. Lytle discusses his decision to disband with Jim and Greg, explaining that the music industry and life on the road became too demanding. With the exception of a tour Grandaddy did with Elliott Smith, Lytle was unhappy with how larger corporate tours were structured. For this current acoustic tour, Lytle wanted to return to a simple road trip among friends.

Fans of Grandaddy need not mourn the loss of Lytle's songwriting and production, however. He has relocated to Montana, but promises that more music is still to come. Listen to the two songs he performs, "Disconnecty" and "Jeez Louise," the latter of which is semi-autobiographical. In addition, Lytle treats us to a Sheryl Crow cover, "Always on Your Side" — a surprising choice for sure. Next time perhaps he'll treat us to a song by Electric Light Orchestra, another secret favorite of our guest.

Go to episode 37

Glenn Kotche

This week Jim and Greg are joined by percussionist extraordinaire Glenn Kotche. He is best known as one of the members of Wilco, but he also has a number of side projects, and a new solo album entitled Mobile. Glenn joins our hosts to discuss all things drumming and to play some of his inventive music. What makes Glenn's drumming style so special is that it ranges from the avant-garde to the straight-ahead rock he does with Wilco, yet it's always in service of the song. You can hear his solo tracks "Monkey Chant" and "Projections of (What) Might" during the show.

After playing for a bit, Glenn gives our hosts a little tour around his kit. Some of Glenn's toys include crotales, a glockenspiel, contact mics (which amplify and alter the drum sounds), and a superball mallet (or half of it). The drummer also has a prepared snare drum which is affixed with different springs and wires, similar to a John Cage prepared piano. He also stole his wife's fruit basket, which the two received as a wedding present. But, perhaps the most unusual percussion instruments that Glenn uses are light-sensitive toy crickets that anyone can pick up in Chinatown.

The discussion ends with a conversation about some of the best (and worst) rock drummers. Some of Jim, Greg, and Glenn's favorites include: Mo Tucker of the Velvet Underground, Meg White of The White Stripes, Elliott Smith, Levon Helm of The Band, and Keith Moon of The Who (despite the accusations of overplaying).

Go to episode 42
reviews
New MoonNew Moon available on iTunes

Elliott Smith New Moon

Elliott Smith passed away in 2003 due to an apparent suicide, though, that is still not official. Before his death he recorded five solo albums and performed with the band Heatmiser. He had an intense fan base that hasn't diminished in his death. In 2004 his family and friends released From a Basement on the Hill. Now they've released New Moon, a two-CD collection of songs Smith recorded for the Kill Rock Stars label between 1994 and 1997. Greg explains that this collection really helps you hear his growth as a songwriter. He doesn't agree with notions that these are lo-fi, basement recordings. Rather, the recording is well done and the songwriting top-notch. He gives it a Buy It. Jim agrees saying that Smith would've been proud to release everything on New Moon, and he likes it better than From a Basement. He also gives it a Buy It.

JimGreg
Go to episode 78
ColorsColors available on iTunes

Beck Colors

Beck won a surprise late career Album of the Year Grammy for his 2014 record Morning Phase. Now, he's back with his 13th album, Colors, co-produced by Adele and Kelly Clarkson collaborator Greg Kurstin. Although Beck constantly reinvented himself in the 1990s, Greg says that here, he's simply recycling his greatest pop moves of the past. Greg acknowledges that he still knows a great hook and continues to mix and match genres. Because it's so cheerful in comparison to the melancholy Morning Phase, Greg finds it difficult to dislike, but it still only merits a Try It. Jim, however, finds it a big improvement over the last record. While Beck isn‘t reinventing the wheel, he’s having fun with pastiches to The Police, Elliott Smith, and more. According to Jim, these songs are as good as any he's ever given us. He says Colors is a great party record and a Buy It.

JimGreg
Go to episode 621
lists

Posthumous Releases

It's true that rock and roll can never die, and neither can its icons. Recently music fans have been treated to three major posthumous releases from Elliott Smith, Jeff Buckley and Nick Drake. Releasing music by a deceased artist is tricky business; you can run the risk of doing overkill or being tacky. Let's see how these three memorial efforts pan out:

Go to episode 78

The Best of 2007… So Far

Jim and Greg just couldn‘t wait until the end of the year to start picking their favorite albums, so they’ve decided to name their 2007 mid-year best.

Go to episode 81