Results for Earth, Wind & Fire

reviews
DrunkDrunk available on iTunes

Thundercat Drunk

Stephen Bruner, better know as Thundercat, is an in-demand session bassist. A resume containing artists from Kendrick Lamar to Suicidal Tendencies is testament to that. Thundercat is also a songwriter in his own right and has just released his third album, Drunk. Weighing in at 23 tracks, Greg says it is a challenging listen. With references to jazz fusion, Earth, Wind and Fire, and cameos from Kenny Loggins and Michael McDonald he admits the album is“bewildering,”especially as Thundercat vacillates from introspective songs about mortality and police brutality, to shopping for anime in Tokyo. But, Greg says it is an“audio-veritae”of Thundercat's life, that shows virtuosity and personality. That said, Greg stops short of saying Buy It and instead gives it a Try It and he eagerly awaits what is next from Thundercat.Jim, had a much more visceral reaction to this record saying he“despises it”and claiming it left him with a skin rash (Editor's Note: we didn't verify this). He says the album is full of“pointless busyness”as Thundercat tries to cram too many ideas into his music. It goes without saying, Jim gives it a Trash It.

JimGreg
Go to episode 589
dijs

Greg

“Kalimba Story”Earth, Wind and Fire

The Desert Island Jukebox segment is often an opportunity to give love to an artist who doesn't get enough of it. Prime example? Earth, Wind and Fire. Sure we‘ve all heard the hits at weddings. But brothers Verdine and Maurice White were musical geniuses in Greg’s opinion. And one of their strengths was linking the funk of the 1970's to its roots in Africa. They did this through dress, but also through the use of instruments like the Kalimba. Check out the rhythms in Greg's choice of the week, "Kalimba Story."

Go to episode 312
lists

Revolver covers

To show the range of influence Revolver has had on the music industry, Jim and Greg commissioned this montage of Beatles covers from this album. Here's a list of the songs you hear:

  • "Taxman" by Stevie Ray Vaughan
  • "Eleanor Rigby" by Ray Charles
  • "I'm Only Sleeping" by Rosanne Cash
  • "Love You To" by Bongwater
  • "Here, There and Everywhere" by Emmylou Harris
  • "Yellow Submarine" by Arthur Fiedler & the Boston Pops
  • "She Said, She Said," by Gov't Mule
  • "Good Day Sunshine," by Jimmy James & the Vagabonds
  • "And Your Bird Can Sing" by Matthew Sweet & Susanna Hoffs
  • "For No One" by Rickie Lee Jones
  • "Doctor Robert" by Bozo Allegro
  • "I Want to Tell You" by Ted Nugent
  • "Got To Get You Into My Life" by Earth, Wind & Fire
  • "Tomorrow Never Knows" by Brian Eno
Go to episode 117

Revolver covers

To show the range of influence Revolver has had on the music industry, Jim and Greg commissioned this montage of covers from The Beatles' album:

  1. "Taxman" by Stevie Ray Vaughan
  2. "Eleanor Rigby" by Ray Charles
  3. "I'm Only Sleeping" by Rosanne Cash
  4. "Love You To" by Bongwater
  5. "Here, There and Everywhere" by Emmylou Harris
  6. "Yellow Submarine" by Arthur Fiedler & the Boston Pops
  7. "She Said, She Said," by Gov't Mule
  8. "Good Day Sunshine," by Jimmy James & the Vagabonds
  9. "And Your Bird Can Sing" by Matthew Sweet & Susanna Hoffs
  10. "For No One" by Rickie Lee Jones
  11. "Doctor Robert" by Bozo Allegro
  12. "I Want to Tell You" by Ted Nugent
  13. "Got To Get You Into My Life" by Earth, Wind & Fire
  14. "Tomorrow Never Knows" by Brian Eno
Go to episode 25
rock doctors

David & Family

The Rock Doctors' patient this week is David from Minneapolis. David's“ailment”is that he has a tough time finding music that both he and his kids will enjoy. As the father of four boys between the ages of three months and 10 years, that's quite a challenge. So far he's had luck with The Decemberists, Earth, Wind and Fire and Sugar — basically anything with great pop vocals and harmonies, as well as a good beat for dancing. And of course, some of his sons have fallen under the spell of tween pop star Kelly Clarkson.

Greg's prescription is New Magnetic Wonder, the latest album from Apples in Stereo. The Robert Schneider-fronted band that emerged out of the Elephant 6 collective offers a perfect mix of sunny, exuberant vocals and sophisticated arrangements. Plus, as Greg explains, Schneider is just a big overgrown kid (something that listeners who heard his interview on Sound Opinions can attest to).

Jim prescribes a dose of Smash Mouth. A couple of years ago the California garage popsters, who Jim thinks of as the male equivalent of No Doubt, released a greatest hits album called All Star Smash Hits. Jim explains that, as a fan of garage rock, David will appreciate their edgy aesthetic and punk covers. In addition, his kids are certain to enjoy the more bubble gum aspects of Smash Mouth's music and covers of songs like "I'm a Believer" (which they might already know from the Shrek 2 soundtrack).

A week later David returns to the doctors to report on his health status. He relays to Greg that he and all his sons really enjoyed the Apples in Stereo. He describes the band's music as fun and upbeat, as well as weird and experimental. David's wife was another story, but these doctors only agreed to please five patients… six might be pushing it.

Smash Mouth was something the whole family could agree on, especially for road trips and casual listening. The six year old described it as "a lot like rock and roll." But, David and his boys found the Apples in Stereo to be“meatier”and more interesting. Perhaps we've got four young rock critics in the making!

Go to episode 76
news

Music News

Maurice White, founder of the great R&B band Earth, Wind & Fire, passed away on February 4 at the age of 74. White started in Chicago as a jazz drummer, playing on Chess Records sessions by Willie Dixon and Etta James before being recruited into Ramsey Lewis's band. The crossover success of that gig allowed him to finance Earth, Wind & Fire, an extravagant showpiece band that could contain more than a dozen members – a flashy update of the big bands of the swing era. Greg goes so far as to call White the "Duke Ellington of R&B." Blending Latin music, R&B, jazz, and African music, Earth, Wind & Fire scored a string of hits in the 1970s. For Greg, the epitome of the band was the 1975 song "Shining Star" which offered a uplifting message during a period of racial strife.

Go to episode 533