Results for De La Soul

interviews

Common

This week on the show Jim and Greg meet with rapper Common, who happens to be visiting his hometown. Common is currently touring to promote his sixth (and, some would say, best) album, Be. Jim and Greg note that most hip-hop artists don‘t have his kind of longevity. In fact, Common is at an age where he has started to balance his career with fatherhood. Greg, who visited the set of Common’s sultry video shoot for the song "Go," asks him how he‘ll be able to present his more adult side to his daughter. Fans of Common’s videos should also check out his most recent, and most cinematic, "Testify."

Common actually performs "Testify" live for our hosts. This song was produced by longtime collaborator and fellow southsider Kanye West, and includes the producer's signature use of soul samples. For Be, Common also worked with ?uestlove of The Roots and rapper and producer J Dilla, who passed away just weeks before this interview. Dilla, or Jay Dee, has been a mainstay on the hip-hop scene, producing songs for De La Soul, Pharcyde, Janet Jackson, and D'Angelo. Dilla also worked with Common on Like Water For Chocolate, producing one of his biggest hits, "The Light." As Common explains, the loss of his friend and former roommate will be life-changing. And in his memory, the rapper does some freestyling over Dilla instrumentals — a first for Sound Opinions.

Go to episode 26
specials

Psychedelic Soul

Next up Jim and Greg check into the“Psychedelic Shack”for a discussion of Psychedelic Soul music. One of the architects of the genre, Norman Whitfield, passed away recently, so Jim and Greg thought his sound warranted more discussion. As a songwriter and producer, Whitfield helped escort The Temptations from their Motown sound, to one that was much funkier and rock-inspired. As Greg explains Whitfield wanted to“out-Sly Sly.”By Sly he is of course referring to Sly and the Family Stone, who along with Jimi Hendrix, are the pillars of the early Psychedelic Soul movement. For a full taste of the genre, Jim and Greg recommend checking out the following artists:

  • The Temptations
  • Sly and the Family Stone
  • Jimi Hendrix
  • War
  • George Clinton
  • Isley Brothers
  • De La Soul
  • Digital Underground
  • Dr. Octagon
  • Gnarls Barkley
Go to episode 149
classic album dissections
Promo photo

De La Soul 3 Feet High And Rising

Jim and Greg explore De La Soul's 1989 3 Feet High And Rising, one of the most enduring albums from the Golden Age of Hip-Hop. It was a recording that broke the mold of what hip-hop could be, utilizing Prince Paul's artful, eclectic production, and Mase, Trugoy, and Posdnuos' unique style.

Greg notes that it's an album that celebrated uniqueness, and made it okay for rappers to be“nerdy”rather than "street". The hosts also dig into the story of the breakout hit from 3 Feet High and Rising, Me, Myself, and I. They also explore how the album's 200 samples set the stage for a decades long legal battle that impacted the sound of hip hop for years to come.

Go to episode 704
lists

Strange Bedfellows of Rock

aerosmith-run-dmc Sometimes an odd pairing comes off like peanut butter and chocolate (Aerosmith and Run-D.M.C.). Othertimes, peanut butter and sardines (Julio Iglesias and Willie Nelson). And the most recent odd couple is Kanye West and Paul McCartney, with the first single from West's forthcoming album. But during this segment, Jim and Greg remember the most successful "Strange Bedfellows."

Go to episode 478

The Best of Rock Whistling

"Young Folks" features some of the best whistling in rock history — some of it done live, some of it done with the help of a sampler and whistlers in the audience. In honor of the band's appearance on the show, Jim and Greg decided to name some other great moments in rock whistling. Here are their picks. Whistling fans should also check out this DJ Riko's whistling mashup, "Whistler's Delight."

Go to episode 83
rock doctors

Pat

In the HMO-free universe of the Rock Doctors, everyone is entitled to better musical health. This week's patient is Pat from Chicago, IL. Pat wrote to Sound Opinions H.Q. for advice on how to get better acquainted with hip hop, and we immediately set her up for an appointment with Drs. Kot and DeRogatis. Pat explains that she's generally fairly hip to music, preferring doses of Bob Dylan, Wilco and Galaxie 500. But when it comes to hip hop, she's clueless, and in an effort to expand her musical horizons and have some music in common with her rap-loving nephews, she asks for some guidance.

Greg gives the first prescription. He's not sure if his approach will be too radical, but judging from Pat's tastes, he decides to go out on a limb. He recommends the patient listen to Outkast's fourth album Stankonia. Greg admits to Pat that some moments might be slightly too "gangsta" or misogynistic for her, but he hopes that the first-rate songwriting and bold beats of tracks like "Ms. Jackson" will win her over.

Jim's prescription is 3 Feet High and Rising, the classic hip hop album by De La Soul. Jim thinks Pat will respond well to the creative stories being told by the three geeky hippies from Long Island. He also thinks she will appreciate some of the more recognizable samples, like Hall and Oates' song "I Can't Go For That (No Can Do)."

A week later Pat finishes her treatment and reports back to the doctors. She starts off by breaking the bad news to Greg: Stankonia is not for her. She felt there were too many misogynistic moments like the song, "We Luv Deez Hoez," and wouldn‘t feel comfortable sharing this album with her nephews. But, on the brighter side, she really enjoyed the De La Soul album. It’s definitely something she could see herself listening to in the future, and she particularly liked the song, "Eye Know," which samples both Steely Dan and Otis Redding. So, while the treatment wasn't a total success, Pat is on the road to better musical health. And, more importantly, she now has more hip bragging rights with her friends.

Go to episode 90
news

Music News

Many recent news stories have been about the music industry struggling to change its current paradigm. This week is no exception. With the rise of digital music distribution, the need to pay money for a hard disc no longer seems so great. So, the question is: how will musicians continue to make money? Tim Fite's answer is,“I won't.”The Anti- recording artist has decided to make his latest album, Over the Counter Culture, available for free on his website. Jim and Greg talk to the musician, who can be described as an intersection between De La Soul, Beck and the folk singers of O Brother Where Art Thou, about his decision not to use his label's resources. Fite explains that the album is anti-commerce, so the album's distribution had to be as well. While Anti- probably hopes this freebie will fuel future for-pay-albums, Fite hopes this model can survive in the future.

Go to episode 65