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Dead Man's Pop

The Replacements Dead Man's Pop

Legendarily shambolic, The Replacements were a great band often a few years ahead of its time. Their 1989 album, Don't Tell A Soul, attempted to polish up their sound in hopes of gaining radio airplay and commercial success, a far-fetched aspiration in retrospect. Still, Sire Records saw enough potential to scrap the original mix the band wanted in favor of a more polished radio-friendly version. The album wound up going nowhere commercially, though just two years later, things may have been different post-Nevermind. Mats fans have speculated ever since what would have happened had the original mix been released. The box set Dead Man's Pop provides a genuine article to fuel that speculation. Original producer Matt Wallace has remixed Don't Tell A Soul to capture the sound the band actually wanted back in 1989. The set also includes a session The Replacements recorded with Tom Waits around this time, as well as a complete live show.

Jim and Greg agree that the production wasn‘t the only problem with Don’t Tell A Soul, so Dead Man's Pop can only improve things so much. Greg finds that the new mixes reveal an inspiration he hadn't previously associated with the album: Rod Stewart's 1971 acoustic-electric album Every Picture Tells A Story. Jim is most appreciative of the concert recording that's included in the box set.

JimGreg
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