Results for Creedence Clearwater Revival

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Copyright Infringement

This week's feature is all about stealing…notes, that is. Throughout the history of recorded music, there have been a number of instances where one artist accuses another of plagiarism. As Jim and Greg discuss, creative thievery can be much more complicated than the bank kind. You have to consider issues of access, influence, song structure and production, not to mention greed and sour grapes.

So to wrap their heads around music copyright lawsuits, they first talk to attorney Charles Cronin about a recent lawsuit involving Coldplay's "Viva La Vida" and Joe Satriani's "If I Could Fly." Professor Cronin is a visiting fellow at Yale Law School and the manager of the Copyright Infringement Project at UCLA. He explains to Jim and Greg that while it may be unlikely that the members of Coldplay sat around jamming to Satriani's guitar licks, a jury might still feel they had access, even unconsciously. The melodic similarities are tiny, but evident. What may be harder for the plaintiff Satriani to prove is that the audience for his music was at all affected by the release of the Coldplay song.

If Satriani vs. Coldplay ever goes to trial, its verdict will no doubt be affected by precedents set in other landmark copyright cases. For a mini legal clinic, read up on these three major cases:

  • Mack vs. Harrison
  • Bridgeport vs. Combs
  • La Cienega Music vs. ZZ Top

To end their discussion on rock plagiarism, Jim and Greg go to one of the most absurd instances of legal action-that when one artist is sued over his own work. In Fantasy vs. Fogerty, the works in question are "Run Through the Jungle" by John Fogerty and "The Old Man Down the Road" by…you guessed it…John Fogerty. The Creedence Clearwater Revival frontman was accused of cribbing his own notes. Jim and Greg speak to Kenneth Sidle, the attorney who successfully defended Fogerty against his former publishing company in this case. Sidle agrees that major changes are needed in copyright laws and how they are handled in court.

Go to episode 166
reviews
Revival

John Fogerty Revival

The final album up for review comes from a fellow classic rock icon: John Fogerty. The Creedence Clearwater Revival leader seems to be coming to terms with his past on his new record, Revival. He's back on Fantasy Records, is performing CCR tunes live for the first time in years, and even has a track on the album called "Creedence Song." In addition, Greg thinks that Fogerty's come closest to reviving his signature CCR sound on this album. He says that the singer is getting back into the groove, but he's not quite there yet. He gives it a Try It. Jim admits that Fogerty is looking back to the past, but it's not a past he wants to hear. His favorite CCR albums were the live ones that hypnotized you with that swampy, groove-filled drone. Jim doesn't hear any of that on Revival, and was further disappointed with the idealized lyrics. He gives the record a Trash It.

JimGreg
Go to episode 99
lists

One Note Wonders

Rock and roll is an art form that traditionally values change and transformation. But, there are a number of terrific artists and bands who have sustained careers by doing one thing really well. The best examples of these one trick ponies are The Ramones, AC/DC and Motörhead. Fans of these bands know that their sounds don‘t change from album to album… but they don’t care! Jim and Greg celebrate these and other One Note Wonders. Here are their nominations:

Go to episode 126

Thanksgiving Leftovers

With such a bounty of music in 2019, Jim and Greg didn‘t have enough time to talk about it all. That’s why they're sharing some of their musical Thanksgiving Leftovers this week.

Go to episode 731
news

Music News

Google Music entered the music-streaming fray this week with its new“All Access”service for Android. The world's top search engine is touting All Access as a combination of the best features of Pandora and Spotify. It offers curated“radio”stations alongside millions of tracks users can stream across devices. And Google is hoping users will pony up for that kind of access: unlike its competitors, Google's service will not offer a free option.

Forget the Desert Island - what music would you take to outer space? This week Canadian astronaut Chris Hadfield made news by covering David Bowie's "Space Oddity" from the International Space Station. This isn't the first time rock has blasted into orbit. Last year Jim covered the auction of Apollo 14 astronaut Edgar Mitchell's space mixtape, which featured tunes by Creedence Clearwater Revival and Marvin Gaye. So what tracks would Jim and Greg want to jam to in zero gravity? Greg picks Sun Ra's "Calling Planet Earth," whereas Jim sticks with a classic, The Beatles' "Here Comes the Sun."

Go to episode 390