Results for Beastie Boys

specials

MTV's Silver Anniversary

MTV turns 25 this week. To celebrate (or perhaps mourn), Jim and Greg discuss the station's impact on the music industry. To kick off the dissection, Sound Opinions surveys the opinions of festivalgoers at Chicago's Pitchfork Music Festival.

Go to episode 36
reviews
Washington Square SerenadeWashington Square Serenade available on iTunes

Steve Earle Washington Square Serenade

The album up for review this week is Washington Square Serenade by veteran roots-rocker Steve Earle. This is Earle's 12th studio album, and was partly inspired by his 7th wife. The singer/songwriter has always combined rock, folk and country with strong political messages, but, now he's adding“happiness”to the mix. As you can hear in many of the album's songs, Earle is very much in love with new wife Allison Moorer, who also appears on the record. Another new person in Earle's life is Dust Brothers producer John King, who has previously crafted albums for Beck and the Beastie Boys. King brought in elements of hip hop and Latin music, and Jim loves the results. It took him longer to get into Washington Square Serenade, than any other Earle album, but with the exception of two bum tracks, he gives it a Try It. Greg is less pleased with the happy Steve Earle. He explains that with the new wife, producer and location, this effort has all the trappings of a“mid-life crisis”recording. Only some of it works for Greg, and he misses the political broadsides of previous albums. Greg also gives Washington Square Serenade a Try It.

JimGreg
Go to episode 97
lists

Sophomore Success

They say that it takes a lifetime to make your first record and only a few months to make your second. If that's true, then it's no surprise that most artists face the dreaded“sophomore slump.”But, a rare few second albums meet or even exceed the first effort. Here are Jim & Greg's picks for Sophomore Success Stories:

Go to episode 252

The Best Songs of 2011 - Mixtapes

As 2011 comes to a close, it's a great time to think about the songs that defined the year. Jim and Greg have compiled their favorite songs into mixtapes. During the show you'll hear a small selection, but luckily you can stream both mixes in their entirety. And you can make your own.

Happy New Year from Sound Opinions!

Go to episode 318
news

Music News

First up Jim and Greg talk about Matchbox Twenty. That's right, Matchbox Twenty. But it isn't the adult contemporary gods‘ music our hosts are interested in; it’s their new album release strategy. Rob Thomas and company are releasing 11 versions of their new album Exile on Mainstream including a USB bracelet, iTunes bundle, VH1 stream, and a good old-fashioned CD. It is certainly out-of-the-box thinking for the band's label, but it remains to be seen how fans will respond.

Another novel approach to music marketing is the fusion of rock and…video games. Guitar Hero III recently hit the stores, and in just seven days it made over $100 million. The game is selling for much more than a standard CD, but as Jim and Greg explain, those numbers are higher than most bands can boast. In 2006, the video game industry made 12.5 billion dollars, while the music industry was down to 12 billion and sinking. This fact hasn't gone unnoticed by labels, and now many bands are using games like Guitar Hero to promote themselves. This version contains tracks by the Beastie Boys, Weezer and Smashing Pumpkins, and The Sex Pistols even re-recorded their anti-capitalist punk anthem "Anarchy in the U.K." just for the game. Call them out-of-touch, but Jim and Greg wonder why rock fans aren't just picking up a real guitar?

The Eagles also had a successful week. Their new album, the first in studio effort in 28 years, hit the #1 spot on the Billboard Chart. This was due to a change in chart policies. Previously Nielsen SoundScan didn't include sales figures from individual retailers. But, now that artists are striking exclusive deals with outlets like Target, Starbucks, and in this case, Wal-Mart, the band was able to beat out Britney and score the year's second-best selling album.

Go to episode 102

Music News

Adam “MCA” Yauch, one of the three founding members of the Beastie Boys, died last week after a three year battle with throat cancer. As Greg notes, the Beastie Boys didn't just transform hip hop. Yauch also transformed himself. After releasing two best-selling albums, License to Ill and Paul's Boutique, Yauch noticed how the group's (sometimes jokey, sometimes offensive) lyrics affected people. He began to incorporate his own political and spiritual views into the Beasties' music, without being too preachy. A great example of this is the 1994 track "Sure Shot."

Go to episode 337

Music News

You might have seen this viral video by San Francisco-based toy company GoldieBlox featuring a feisty reinterpretation of the Beastie Boys song "Girls." The start-up is now enmeshed in a legal dispute over its right to use the song. The bizarre part? GoldieBlox started it. The company filed a pre-emptive strike against the Beasties claiming that the video, as a parody, constitutes fair use. (It reminds Greg of a similar lawsuit that Robin Thicke and Co. filed this summer. The Beastie Boys responded:“As creative as it is, make no mistake, your video is an advertisement that is designed to sell a product.”It looks like you gotta fight for your right to parody…

As GoldieBlox realized, a good ad soundtrack can really break a product (or a song for that matter) into the public consciousness. But these days, songs used in ads are often separated from their products, thanks in large part to Shazam, an app that lets smartphone users identify and buy songs they hear on TV, the radio or out and about. Now Shazam is teaming up with media-services giant Mindshare on a program called Audio+ that aims to really beef up the association of products and music. The details will be announced next week, but this news already has Jim questioning: where do we draw the line between art and commerce?

Admittedly, Greg has never really“gotten”the whole Robbie Williams phenomenon. But now the British pop star has released the 1000th number one album in the U.K. Back in 1956 that Frank Sinatra's Songs For Swingin' Lovers! became the Brits‘ first #1. Now Robbie Williams’s Swings Both Ways has become the 1,000th.

Go to episode 418