Results for Beach Boys

interviews

Best Coast

Jim and Greg are joined by the members of Best Coast. The indie trio, named for lead singer Bethany Cosentino's beloved California region, has a unique combination of shoegaze rock and '60s throwback harmonies reminiscent of the Beach Boys and the Mamas and the Papas. Their debut Crazy for You was a surprise hit for an indie release-reaching the Billboard Top 40. Cosentino talks to Jim and Greg about her own musical roots (Dad performed with 70's rock band War), rock heroes (Stevie Nicks) and personal writing style. She's joined by band mates Bobb Bruno on guitars and Ali Koehler, formerly of The Vivian Girls, on drums for a live performance in the studio.

Go to episode 258
specials

The Elephant 6 Collective

The recent death of Olivia Tremor Control co-founder Bill Doss has Jim and Greg thinking about the legacy of the musical collective he was a part of: The Elephant 6 Recording Company. This week, they revisit their conversation about Elephant 6 with the collective's chief producer, Robert Schneider. For those new to this crazy universe, Elephant 6 was a label started by childhood friends from Ruston, Louisiana. The bands that came out of this group of music-lovers included some of the most beloved of the indie rock nineties: Neutral Milk Hotel, Olivia Tremor Control, and Apples in Stereo. Schneider was the chief songwriter, producer, and lead singer of Apples in Stereo. He explains how he and his friends first heard the psychedelic pop of the Beach Boys, The Beatles, and Pink Floyd hanging around Ruston's college radio station as kids. The collective's most important albums, among them The Olivia Tremor Control's Dusk at Cubist Castle and Neutral Milk Hotel's In the Aeroplane Over the Sea, bear the sonic mark of those early listening sessions.

Greg calls The Olivia Tremor Control the trippiest of the Elephant 6 groups. He and Jim discuss their debut release, Dusk at Cubist Castle, a double album whose subtitle,“Music from an Unrealized Film Script,”points to the music's psychedelic nature. Greg calls Jeff Mangum of Neutral Milk Hotel the“soul child”of the collective. Jeff went for a stripped down approach that was moving and easily identifiable for many listeners. This is evident in the band's 1998 release In the Aeroplane Over the Sea, a concept album about tragedy, and at times, Anne Frank. The longest lasting of all the Elephant 6 acts is Apples in Stereo. In addition to being the collective's four-track guru, Schneider was always the“pop craftsman.”In 2007 Apples reformed and put out New Magnetic Wonder, a return to power pop form for the group, and one of their best recordings to date.

Go to episode 353
reviews
SmileSmile available on iTunes

Brian Wilson Smile

Beach Boys fans have been waiting over forty years for Brian Wilson's lost record, Smile. Now we can finally hear those abandoned recordings from 1967 on the Smile Sessions. But as Jim explains, a lost album usually deserves to stay that way. He doesn‘t hear any of the emotion that made Wilson’s masterpiece Pet Sounds so wonderful. And the studio experimentation is more mess than art. The Smile Sessions detract from the Beach Boys legacy, according to Jim, so he says Trash It. Greg would‘ve expected different from a Syd Barrett fan. He hears a lot of idiosyncratic whimsy. Sure, it’s not as emotional as Pet Sounds, but it's a“fascinating curio”and successful song cycle. Greg says Buy It.

JimGreg
Go to episode 314
Crazy for YouCrazy For You available on iTunes

Best Coast Crazy For You

Also from California - and proudly so - is Best Coast. The band's debut album was the much buzzed about Crazy For You, a hit fueled as much by Beach Boys pop as it was by lead singer Bethany Cosentino's intense homesickness (she was in a band in New York for a time). Jim says that Best Coast's sophomore album, The Only Place, might come under fire for being simply more of the same. That might be true, if by“same”you mean it's another album of indelibly catchy pop. But he also points out the darkness of Beth's lyrics this time around. She's singing about her desire to be loved for who she is, and as Greg points out, she's doing so sincerely and movingly. Both Jim and Greg agree this is summery pop at its best. They say Buy It.

JimGreg
Go to episode 345
dijs

Greg

“Hideway”Olivia Tremor Control

In honor of Olivia Tremor Control co-founder Bill Doss, Greg drops "Hideway" from the band's second album, Black Foliage, into the Desert Island Jukebox. Doss died this week at age 43 of unknown causes. Doss was a founding member of the Elephant 6 recording collective, a group of friends from Ruston, Louisiana whose bands Neutral Milk Hotel, The Apples in Stereo, and The Olivia Tremor Control left a potent legacy in the nineties. Using cheap boom boxes and four track recorders, the friends sought to replicate the lush pop sounds of the Beach Boys and the Beatles on a budget. Greg calls The Olivia Tremor Control the trippiest and most psychedelic of the Elephant 6 bands. They were known for their layering of avant-garde sounds and pop melody. The band reunited in 2009 and played a terrific set at the Pitchfork music festival shortly before Doss's death.

Go to episode 349
lists

Songs About The Sea

Seventy-one percent of the earth is covered with water, so it's no surprise many musicians have looked to the sea for inspiration. From adventure to tragedy, Jim and Greg have gathered songs about the ocean that run the gamut.

Go to episode 662

Rock's Best Lead-Off Tracks

This week's show is dedicated to the true rock geeks out there. Continuing in the tradition of "Track 1, Side 1" Jim and Greg take the discussion into the post-vinyl age. What songs best kick-off an album? Here are their picks for the best Lead-Off Tracks of all time:

Go to episode 92

Best Driving Songs

For many of us summer equals a road trip. And a road trip equals great Driving Music. During this episode Jim and Greg play their favorite driving songs.

Go to episode 188

Tearjerkers: Songs That Make You Cry

Feel a lump in your throat? Go ahead and let it all out as Jim and Greg play some of the greatest musical Tearjerkers. These weepies make you cry, no matter how strong your disposition.

Go to episode 439
features

Sample Platter: Lupe Fiasco's "Kick, Push"

In 2006, Lupe Fiasco released the song "Kick, Push" which introduced Lupe to a national audience. According to Jim, the song accomplished for skateboarding what the Beach Boys did for surfing. In this installment of Sample Platter, Jim and Greg talk about the unconventional sample that drives "Kick, Push". The sample is pulled from Philipina singer Celeste Legaspi's early 1980s song "Bolero Medley." Plus, we hear Lupe's take on the sample, and how it created inroads for new audiences.

Go to episode 586