Results for Barack Obama

specials

Campaign Songs

Jim and Greg kick off the show with a discussion of some of the best and worst campaign songs in presidential history. Check out this list and decide which have been the most successful. Certainly Michael Dukakis could've made a better choice. And, Jim and Greg wonder what left-leaning Woody Guthrie would've thought of George H.W. Bush's appropriation of "This Land Is Your Land." Also, while he hasn't embraced it as an official campaign song, Barack Obama inspired this Will.I.Am track. Jim is a fan of the Black Eyed Peas member and producer, but even he won't be voting for this song.

Go to episode 120

Presidential Rock

On January 20th, thousands will celebrate the Inauguration of President-Elect Barack Obama. But before that Jim and Greg wanted to host their own celebration by playing the best songs ever written about the office of Commander-in-Chief.

Here's a collection of songs to kick off this new administration:

Go to episode 164

Remembering Aretha Franklin

Aretha On Thursday, August 16, Aretha Franklin,“The Queen of Soul,”died at the age of 76 in Detroit, her hometown. As an 18-time Grammy recipient, the first woman to be inducted in the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame in 1987, and one of the best-selling artists of all time, Franklin's achievements are staggering. But her legacy can't be quantified by mere numbers: Her remarkable discography—defined by that stunning four-octave voice—included songs that became anthems for social change. Gospel critic Anthony Heilbut once asserted that Franklin's role in the Civil Rights Movement was such that“a history of black America could well be divided into pre- and post-Aretha.”Jim and Greg trace her extraordinary career, from her start singing in Detroit's New Bethel Baptist Church (where her father was a star preacher) to being signed with Columbia and Atlantic Records, to zeitgeist-defining performances at the 1998 Grammy Awards, Barack Obama's 2009 Presidential Inauguration, and the 2015 Kennedy Center Honors.

Go to episode 664
news

Music News

The RIAA sues people with such frequency that Jim and Greg aren't always able to keep up. But, when one defendant, Tanya Andersen of Oregon, not only won her case, but forced the Recording Industry to pay up, Jim and Greg took notice. After being sued for copyright infringement, Anderson undertook the long battle of defending herself, followed by a countersuit against the RIAA. Now a year after being ordered to pay for her court bills, the RIAA has finally paid up, with interest.

Campaign ads have been making a lot of headlines recently, and as Jim notes, with those ads comes the inevitable music-related lawsuit. The musician this time around is Jackson Browne. The famously liberal singer/songwriter is suing both Republican candidate John McCain, as well as the Republican National Committee for copyright infringement. The song "Running On Empty" was featured in a campaign ad that mocks Barack Obama's energy conservation plans. Browne is not only seeking financial damages, but also an apology. Since Browne's political leanings are so well-documented, Jim and Greg are concerned about any politician that hasn't mastered the art of Google.

Next up Jim and Greg honor music producer Jerry Wexler, who died recently at the age of 91. Wexler helped put Atlantic Records on the map. While Atlantic colleague Ahmet Ertegun was the shiny face of the label, Wexler was the behind-the-scenes mover and shaker according to Greg. Jim adds that he was one of the last of a generation of“men with ears,”meaning that Wexler's ability to find and foster talent was an art in itself. Perhaps Wexler's greatest find was Aretha Franklin. He helped the singer really shine on tracks like "I Never Loved A Man (The Way I Love You)."

Go to episode 143

Music News

The Grammys may be the most well-known music awards, but the Village Voice Pazz & Jop Critics Poll is perhaps the best barometer of what was good in the world of music. The ballots are in for 2008, and among the almost 600 critics surveyed, TV on the Radio's Dear Science came out on top. As Jim explains, the critics often do it better, but the poll is not perfect, especially since the departure of longtime Pazz & Jop“Dean”Robert Christgau. Usually the Village Voice list is vastly different from the list of Grammy nominations, but this year there are some crossovers, especially in terms of singles. M.I.A's "Paper Planes" and Estelle's "American Boy" got top marks in Pazz & Jop, as well as a number of Grammy noms.

On January 20, President Barack Obama not only inherited 2 wars and a failing economy. He also inherited a pretty kick-ass record collection. According to a recent story in Rolling Stone, there are several hundred LP's in the White House basement, including Led Zeppelin IV, Let it Bleed and Rocket to Russia, all provided by the RIAA and marked with the presidential seal. The list of records was not always so cool though. During the Nixon administration, album artists included Pat Boone and John Denver. So, Jim and Greg want to volunteer their own services to make sure that the collection thrives in the year to come. They say: "Ask not what your country can do for you. Ask what you can do for your country's record collection."

Go to episode 166