Results for Amy Winehouse

interviews

Quincy Jones

Quincy Jones One of the figures in the music industry most closely associated with Michael Jackson is producer Quincy Jones. The multi-Grammy Award winner also had a long-standing relationship with Frank Sinatra and was the force behind "We Are the World". Jim and Greg spoke to Jones shortly before the release of Michael and asked him about whether some of these songs were better left unreleased. Jones believes that money will be at the core of lot of decision-making around Jackson's legacy. Jim and Greg also talk to Jones about his latest record Q: Soul Bossa Nostra, which features Jones tracks updated by Amy Winehouse, Ludacris, Talib Kweli and more.

Go to episode 266
specials

Desert Island Jukebox

All year long, Jim and Greg take turns dropping coins in the Desert Island Jukebox, talking about songs and albums they‘d need with them if stranded on an island. But now, at the year’s end, they're gonna take a break and let some of their favorite past guests do the heavy lifting. Hear what music they can't live without:

  • Lindsey Buckingham: The Beatles, Revolver
  • Trombone Shorty: Louis Armstrong, "On the Sunny Side of the Street"
  • Fred Armisen: Stereolab, "Cybele's Reverie"
  • Trey Parker: Elton John, "Indian Sunset" and Live in Australia with the Melbourne Symphony Orchestra
  • Matt Stone: James Brown, "There Was a Time"
  • Peter Hook: Nico, "Chelsea Girl"
  • Kelis: Rhye, "Open"
  • Robert Plant: Low, The Great Destroyer
  • Kerry King of Slayer: Ozzy Ozbourne, Blizzard of Oz
  • Dave Lombardo of Slayer: Amy Winehouse, Back to Black

Plus, check out our 2009 Desert Island Jukebox Special.

Go to episode 474
reviews
Back to BlackBack to Black available on iTunes

Amy Winehouse Back to Black

This first album up for review this week is of Back to Black, the second album by British import Amy Winehouse. The singer/songwriter was one of the most buzzed about acts at this year's SXSW Festival, and her off-stage antics are getting her a flurry of attention in the British press. Jim and Greg, however, aren't sure the phenomenon will translate overseas. Winehouse prides herself on being influenced by jazz and the R&B and soul singers of the 1960s. But, both critics find her music to be a retro parody more than an authentic homage. In fact, Jim outright hates this album and gives his Trash It rating right up front. Greg didn‘t dislike the album as much as he thought he would, but was still unimpressed by Winehouse’s pale imitation of artists like Donnie Hathaway and Nina Simone. He also gives Back to Black a Trash It.

JimGreg
Go to episode 71
Lioness: Hidden TreasuresLioness: Hidden Treasures available on iTunes

Amy Winehouse Lioness: Hidden Treasures

Amy Winehouse fans didn't have to wait long for her first posthumous release. Lioness: Hidden Treasures is a collection of covers and a couple of original works. But the title is completely misleading according to Greg. Are these really the late singer's treasures? If so, that's sad. Greg calls out the people curating Winehouse's estate for allowing this material to be released-material that features Winehouse blurry and slurry. Jim calls the album grave robbing, pure and simple. Lioness gets a double Trash It.

JimGreg
Go to episode 319
I Learned the Hard Way (Bonus Version)I Learned the Hard Way available on iTunes

Sharon Jones and the Dap-Kings I Learned the Hard Way

The next album up for review is I Learned the Hard Way by Sharon Jones and the Dap-Kings. 53-year-old Jones is the voice of the Daptone label, whose house band the Dap-Kings is perhaps best known as Amy Winehouse's backing band. Greg explains that this title is well-earned for Jones, and her life experiences inform her nuanced vocal style. He loves the dialogue between the singer and the horns section and highly recommends people check the group out live. Greg gives this record a Buy It. Jim has found her previous releases more like souvenirs of the live show. But I Learned the Hard Way is a complete work. There's a retro element, but it's not about looking backward–it's about where Jones is in her life right now. I Learned the Hard Way gets a double Buy It.

JimGreg
Go to episode 228
Endlessly

Duffy Endlessly

Moving on to new releases, Duffy has a new album out called Endlessly. The British singer emerged out of a wave of retro-soul singers like Amy Winehouse and Adele. But here, she's also going for a pop sound. Greg compares her voice to Lulu, and worse, Betty Boop. He's not sure what's special about Duffy. Jim agrees, noting that it feels like Duffy is not wed to the '60s sound, but is instead trying to be everything to everyone. They both give Endlessly a Trash It.

JimGreg
Go to episode 265
VillainsVillains available on iTunes

Queens of the Stone Age Villains

Queens of the Stone Age talk Villains on their 7th release (double 7s this week!). Led by Josh Homme, the group emerged from the ashes of the desert rock band Kyuss and released their debut record in 1998. Almost 20 years later, Queens has had a revolving cast of characters making up the band, but both Jim and Greg think they finally settled on the right chemistry with Dean Fertita, Troy Van Leeuwin, Jon Theodore and Michael Shuman alongside Homme. While initially skeptical, Greg likes producer Mark Ronson's (Amy Winehouse & Bruno Mars collaborator) spin on the record. He thinks Ronson helped elevate the more“dancy”and rhythmic components of Queens. Greg gives Villains a Buy It. Jim loves the riffs and rhythms on this record, but thinks that Greg's praise of the lyrics as more than just another element in the wall of sound are a bit much. However, Jim loves the song "Feet Don't Fail Me" because of its myth-like storytelling. Jim gives Villains a Buy It as well.

JimGreg
Go to episode 615
dijs

Jim

“Sour Times”Portishead

It's Jim's turn to select a song to take with him to the desert island this week. His DIJ pick was inspired by the two albums reviewed in the show. Amy Winehouse considers herself a modern day Nina Simone, and Timbaland uses a Nina Simone sample in his song "Oh Timbaland." Jim is in favor of referencing the past, but wanted to go back to a band that was able to bring a hip hop attitude to classic '60s soul and jazz much more successfully than Winehouse ever could. That band is Portishead. Portishead came out of England during the 1990s as part of the "trip-hop" movement. While their tenure was short (though word is they are making music again), Jim is still impressed by the group's ability to merge American hip hop with British psychedelia with early soul and R&B. The album he urges listeners to go back to is 1994's Dummy, and the track he wants to add to the Desert Island Jukebox is "Sour Times."

Go to episode 71

Jim

“Running On Sand”Mari Wilson

Thinking about Amy Winehouse, Jim is reminded of her roots. Clearly she was influenced by singers like Ronnie Spector in the '60s. But the link between that era and this one was British singer Mari Wilson. She revived retro and sported a beehive long before Amy. Partly jazz, partly pop and partly camp, Wilson had a string of hits in the U.K. in the '80s. Health problems have interfered with her success in recent years, but she did have a comeback album in 2005 called Dolled Up. Jim chooses a track from it called "Running On Sand" to add to the Desert Island Jukebox.

Go to episode 297

Greg

“The Look of Love”Dusty Springfield

The Annie Lennox review prompted Greg to think about other UK soul singers. Of course there's Amy Winehouse now, but the mother of them all was Dusty Springfield. Many people know Dusty for her song "Son of a Preacher Man," which was featured in the movie Pulp Fiction. But the track Greg wants to take with him to the desert island is "The Look of Love," which was written by Burt Bacharach and Hal David. For Greg it highlights Dusty's subtle sexy voice, one that is almost doing a duet with the saxophone. And it also summed up, at one time, what Greg thought marriage was going to be all about: lust, romance and glamorous hair.

Go to episode 98
lists

Desert Island Jukebox

All year long Jim and Greg hog the Desert Island Jukebox and play you songs they can't live without. In this episode, they flip the script and hand over the jukebox quarters to some of their musical guests. Slayer, LCD Soundsystem, Wild Flag and more took on the age-old rock question "What record would you take with you if stranded on a desert island?":

  • Troy“Trombone Shorty”Andrews - Louis Armstrong, "On the Sunny Side of the Street"
  • Alexei Perry of Handsome Furs - Doctor Alimantado, Best Dressed Chicken in Town
  • Dan Boeckner of Handsome Furs - Sonic Youth, Sister
  • Sam Beam of Iron and Wine - Harry Nilsson, Nilsson Schmilsson
  • Naomi Yang and Damon Krukowski of Damon & Naomi - Fairport Convention, Liege and Lief
  • Lily Allen - Squeeze, "Up the Junction"
  • Kerry King of Slayer - Ozzy Osbourne, Blizzard of Ozz
  • Dave Lombardo of Slayer - Amy Winehouse, Back to Black
  • Rebecca Cole of Wild Flag - Bill Withers, Just As I Am
  • Janet Weiss of Wild Flag - The Rolling Stones, Exile on Main St.
  • James Murphy of LCD Soundsystem - Roxy Music, For Your Pleasure
Go to episode 317
rock doctors

Cassie

Whenever Jim and Greg become the Rock Doctors a different challenge is presented. They've had to consult with couples, families and have even staged an intervention. Now they enter the business world. Cassie is a store owner in Chicago who reached out to the Rock Doctors earlier this year. Cassie's problem: What to play in the shop? She tends to return to the same well of old pop and funk over and over again, and her employees are ready to strike. She wants a dose of new music that will keep customers happy and won't cause any eyerolls from the staff.

Jim's prescription is The Budos Band III. The Budos Band is an instrumental band recording on the Daptone Records label, which is also home to Sharon Jones and Amy Winehouse's backing band The Dap-Kings. Jim is confident that Cassie will appreciate their sound, which fuses old-school soul with afro-beat.

Greg prescribes Jim by British singer Jamie Lidell. Greg praises Lidell's vocal style and live performances and thinks that this album will give Cassie the retro R&B she loves, while keeping it fresh.

After playing both albums in her store for a couple of weeks Cassie returns to the show for a follow-up appointment. She has nothing but good things to say about Jim by Jamie Lidell. It's upbeat, feel-good music that impressed her staff and got customers tapping their feet. She also really liked The Budos Band III, and fancied herself in a British spy film. But, Cassie admits it did get repetitive, so she'll be mixing it in a playlist rather than putting the record on beginning to end. All in all, a healthy, happy patient.

Go to episode 259
news

Music News

When news about the death of Amy Winehouse at the age of 27 hit, the music industry was struck with sadness. But, interest in the singer's work was renewed. And now, again proving that death is a great career move, she's back on the charts in the U.S. and the U.K. Her 2006 breakthrough record Back to Black and a number of its singles are selling big. Even her debut record Frank is back in the Top 200.

Go to episode 297

Music News

Jim and Greg don't like to give too much airtime to the Grammy Awards, but there was one upset worth mentioning (other than Amy Winehouse not getting a visa). Beating out big names like Winehouse, Kanye West, The Foo Fighters and Vince Gill for Album of the Year was veteran jazz musician Herbie Hancock.

Go to episode 116