Results for 1974

interviews

Elisabeth Vincentelli on ABBA

ABBA Forty years ago this month, Anni-Frid (Frida) Lyngstad, Benny Andersson, Björn Ulvaeus, and Agnetha Fältskog took the stage at Eurovision 1974, decked out in platform shoes and sequined suits, to perform a new song called "Waterloo." ABBA would become the first Swedish act to win the song contest. And while Eurovision winners rarely stay relevant, ABBA proved a huge exception, cranking out hit after hit in the 1970s before disbanding in 1983. But their legacy is complicated, explains Elisabeth Vincentelli. By day, she's the chief drama critic for the New York Post. But by night she's an ABBA superfan who wrote a 33 1/3 book on ABBA Gold, the group's definitive best-of collection (and one of the top-selling albums in European history).

As Elisabeth reveals to Jim and Greg, there's way more to this band than just "Dancing Queen." Both Agnetha and Frida were well-known performers in Sweden before they married Benny and Björn and started ABBA (Agnetha was also an accomplisehd songwriter). Unfortunately, the two couples struggled to maintain their relationships in the limelight, leading to a downward spiral that Elisabeth likens to Rumours-era Fleetwood Mac (with less tabloid coverage). Things finally fell apart in the early '80s. But a decade later, ABBA saw a strange resurgence among punk and gay subcultures, then among mainstream crowds, thanks to the Australian dramedy Muriel's Wedding and Broadway smash Mamma Mia!. The four members have all found success on their own, but Elisabeth has a bold prediction to make… Could an ABBA reunion could be in the works?

Go to episode 438

Donna Gaines

This week, Jim and Greg present another installment of our Summer School series. This time, they're tackling a question that may be obvious to some: Why do the Ramones Matter?
The Ramones formed in Queens, New York in 1974. The original line-up was lead singer Joey Ramone, guitarist Johnny Ramone, bass guitarist Dee Dee Ramone and drummer Tommy Ramone. And although they were never at the top of the charts, their influence on both punk music and on American culture at large is undeniable. The hosts were joined by Donna Gaines, sociologist, journalist, and author of the book Why The Ramones Matter, to discuss the musical, social, and even political contributions of the band.

Go to episode 714
specials

King Crimson

King Crimson is a classic band that consistently rejects nostalgia. On this week's show, Jim and Greg highlight three distinct periods of innovation in their decades long career and highlight three key albums: 1969's Court of the Crimson King (an early prog rock classic), 1974's Red (a proto-metal album that's only grown in reputation over the years), and 1981's Discipline (a new wave/experimental record on par with work by then-contemporaries like the Talking Heads). Three distinctive sounds from one band with only one constant member: founding guitarist Robert Fripp.

Go to episode 741
dijs

Greg

“Black Sails”Harry Nilsson

Talking about Paul McCartney got Greg thinking about one of The Beatles' longtime friends and contemporaries: Harry Nilsson. Nilsson was especially fond of John Lennon, and the two collaborated on a 1974 album called Pussy Cats. The results, though, were a bit… out there, perhaps because of all the drugs, drink and heartbreak. But that dark mood piqued Greg's interest, and he chooses the song "Black Sails" for a rainy day on the desert island.

Go to episode 413

Jim

“Mother Russia”Renaissance

Most weeks, either Jim or Greg take a trip to the desert island and play a song they can't live without. This week, Jim selected "Mother Russia" by Renaissance, a classical-influenced British prog rock group. Jim thinks that the group doesn‘t get the respect it deserves. He goes on to add that he’s "surpised that bands like The Decemberists or Arcade Fire don't mention Renaissance more as one of the orchestral-pop rediscoveries" because he "hears a lot of the roots of what orc-pop has been doing in the last decade in what Renaissance was doing in 1974."

Go to episode 700