Results for 1972

interviews

Spooner Oldham

Despite its location in a relatively obscure part of the South, Muscle Shoals, Alabama was home to some of the greatest studio musicians of the 1960's and 1970's. One of those pros was our guest Spooner Oldham, keyboardist and songwriter at FAME Studios. Spooner played piano and organ on hits like "Steal Away" by Jimmy Hughes and Percy Sledge's "When a Man Loves a Woman." Pretty soon, record executives from the North were sending artists down to record with the excellent house band at FAME. Spooner provided the drive behind Wilson Pickett's "Mustang Sally," and even rescued a stagnating Aretha Franklin session by coming up with the iconic keyboard line for "I Never Loved a Man (The Way I Love You)."

Along with his collaborator Dan Penn, Spooner Oldham wrote huge hits like "Cry Like a Baby" by The Box Tops and "I'm Your Puppet" by James & Bobby Purify. After leaving Muscle Shoals, he played with Neil Young, Bob Dylan, Bobby Womack, and more, and continues to perform with acts like Cat Power and Drive-By Truckers. In 1972, Spooner recorded his own album Pot Luck. It was largely forgotten except by cult record collectors, but now is being honored with an overdue reissue from Light in the Attic.

Go to episode 515
reviews
Black Panther The Album Music From And Inspired ByBlack Panther available on iTunes

Kendrick Lamar & Anderson Paak & the Weeknd & SZA & Vince Staples Black Panther

The film Black Panther has broken all sorts of box office records, but its the soundtrack that has caught Jim and Greg's attention. Helmed by Kendrick Lamar, the album features a stars like SZA, the Weeknd and Anderson Paak; but Greg notes that lesser known artists like singer Jorja Smith and South African rapper Yugen Blakrock are“the real revelation”here. Greg says Blakrock goes toe to toe and holds her own against Vince Staples on Opps. He adds that producer Sounwave contributes a“haunted”Carribean sound. Jim loves the "musical variety: R&B, rap, afro soul, and South African pop. He notes that though the album isn't as closely connected to the film as Curtis Mayfield's 1972 classic Super Fly, it is "a wonderful companion to the film". Jim and Greg give the album a double Buy It.

JimGreg
Go to episode 640
dijs

Jim

“Mink Dress”Plasticland

Jim's Desert Island Jukebox pick for this week is "Mink Dress" by Plasticland. The song is one of many psychedelic tracks found on Children of Nuggets: Original Artyfacts from the Second Psychedelic Era—1976-1996. This Rhino compilation is one of many Nuggets installments, the first being the two-vinyl set compiled by Lenny Kaye in 1972. While there are some gems on the most recent collection, it is pretty much a mess according to Jim, a huge fan of the psychedelic genre. "Mink Dress" is one of the standout tracks. Plasticland was started by Glen Rehse and John Frankovic in Milwaukee in the '80s. Despite their Midwestern roots, Rehse and Frankovic were drawn to the colorful '60s-era British Psychedelia. Their song follows in the tradition of "Arnold Layne" by the Syd Barrett-era Pink Floyd and explores the songwriter's fascination with women's clothing—in this case, a mink dress.

Go to episode 3
news

Music News

Whitney Houston is just the latest in a series of deceased musicians who have been made into holograms in order to tour around the world. Other famous holograms include Tupac, Buddy Holly, Liberace and Roy Orbison but this isn't anything new for the entertainment industry. For years, images of Elvis Presley and even Frank Sinatra were shown in concerts singing along with a live band and performers. And while the joke is that death is a great career move, Jim finds it interesting that it is no longer an impediment to touring. Who would you like to see as a hologram or do you think the whole thing is just too weird?

Back in 1972, Aretha Franklin recorded one of the great gospel albums of all time, Amazing Grace. In 2012, Jim and Greg even did a Classic Album Dissection on the live record because it was so good and so iconic. Famous director Sydney Pollack (Tootsie, Out of Africa) filmed the concert back in the '70s and now more than 40 years later, two major film festivals were finally supposed to show the movie. However, Aretha took legal action to block the film festivals from presenting it. Apparently she loves the film but Greg suspects this whole thing has something to do with money. This one may drag on, but Greg and Jim really hope that they sort things out because this is a true piece of musical history.

Go to episode 512

Music News

North Carolina Congressman Melvin Watt has introduced a bill that promises to shake up the radio world. Known as the "Free Market Royalty Act," it would require broadcasters—online and offline alike—to compensate artists and labels whose music they play. (Under the current rules, only the songwriter and rights holder receive the royalties, and terrestrial radio stations get a free ride.) While artists have come out in support of the bill, The National Association of Broadcasters — the U.S. radio industry's lobbying arm—is making its opposition known, warning that this“performance tax”would burden already-struggling radio stations.

Over on the charts, a string of debuts took top slots. Drake's new album Nothing Was the Same exploded at number one, making it the second best-selling debut week for any artist in 2013 (topped only by Justin Timberlake). And, for the second week running, Miley Cyrus'“Wrecking Ball”is number one on Billboard's Hot 100… but is it really? In February, Billboard began including digital streaming in its tally for the Hot 100. So, Miley has YouTube to thank for her success.

In other weird charts news, the finale of AMC's smash hit Breaking Bad aired last week, and it closed with the forgotten Badfinger track "Baby Blue." Hours after the final credits rolled, 5,000 fans had purchased the 1972 song on iTunes, and its Spotify streams skyrocketed by 9,000%. Greg thought it was a good song choice, but Jim says that he would have preferred Bob Dylan's "It's All Over Now, Baby Blue." (Hey, at least it wasn't as painful as The Sopranos farcical "Don‘t Stop Believin’."

Jim and Greg invite you to "Ask the Critic." This week they answer a question from Kevin, a 15-year-old fan from Chicago. Kevin seeks advice on starting a band. Jim and Greg tell him to play from the heart…never mind those stinkin' critics! Got a question for Jim and Greg? Email interact@soundopinions.org or call 888.859.1800.

Go to episode 410

Music News

The Turtles are best known for hits like 1967's "Happy Together." But, vocalists Flo and Eddie, or Howard Kaylan and Mark Volman, are still making news—but more for their legal battles than their music. Last year they sued SiriusXM for $100 million, saying that by playing its songs without permission, the broadcaster had infringed on the group's rights under state laws. The first ruling came down in September in California, in favor of The Turtles. Then, earlier this month, a district court judge in New York ruled against SiriusXM and rejected its motion for summary judgment. This is being considered a major victory for artists and record companies in the copyright debate. But, more significantly, it may have wider impact if the cases lead to changes in copyright law—specifically an obscure provision on recordings made before 1972 when federal copyright protection went into effect. For songs by the Turtles and other "oldies" acts, neither SiriusXM nor services like Pandora pay labels or artists. They do, however, pay royalties for songwriting. So, it begs the question - who should get credit, financial that is, for a song—the songwriter, the performer, or both? And as Wondering Sound Lead News Writer Marc Hogan explains, $60 million/year is at stake according to royalties organization SoundExchange. So lawmakers better get cracking.

Go to episode 470