Results for 1966

interviews

Donovan

This week Jim and Greg talk with legendary '60s singer/songwriter Donovan. In honor of his 40th anniversary in the music business, Donovan has written an autobiography, released a box set, and set out on tour. A contemporary of Bob Dylan and The Beatles, Donovan was acclaimed for his finger-picking style, which he garnered from The Carter Family and demonstrates for our hosts.

Jim and Greg also want to know about the sex, drugs, and rock and roll in Donovan's life. Specifically, they discuss his experience being busted for drugs in 1966. His arresting officer, Sgt. Pilcher, later targeted fellow British rockers Keith Richards, Mick Jagger, Brian Jones and John Lennon.

Another part of the Donovan mythology involves the origin of his song "Mellow Yellow." As Jim points out, many people believe that Donovan was alluding to the ability to get high by smoking banana peels. While Donovan does not refute this idea, which was tried out by Country Joe McDonald, he also admits that part of the song's imagery was taken from a“marital device”he saw advertised in a magazine. In his book, Donovan also suggests that Andy Warhol may have been inspired by the "electrical banana."

Jim and Greg also ask Donovan about covers of his songs. They play for him the Butthole Surfers' rendition of "Hurdy Gurdy Man." Other notable covers include Hüsker Dü's "Sunshine Superman," Eartha Kitt's "Hurdy Gurdy Man," and My Morning Jacket's "Wear Your Love Like Heaven."

Go to episode 7

Peter Lewis of Moby Grape

Moby Grape When Moby Grape formed in San Francisco in 1966, some critics saw them as America's answer to The Beatles. Their line-up was stacked with three talented guitarists (Skip Spence, Peter Lewis and Jerry Miller) and all five band members sang lead and wrote songs (bassist Bob Mosley and drummer Don Stevenson rounded out the band). They could play radio-friendly music as well as psychedelic experimental music. Columbia Records was excited to support them and it seemed there was nowhere to go but up. But before they could ascend to the top of the music industry, a string of bad luck got in their way.

This week, guitarist Peter Lewis explains to Jim and Greg how a bad manager, an overzealous publicity strategy and mental illness combined with a drug cocktail relegated Moby Grape to "buried treasure" status, even 52 years after their debut album was released. He also talks about how they developed their three guitar approach, their friendship with Buffalo Springfield and Skip Spence's solo album Oar, which he wrote over his six months in Bellevue psychiatric hospital.

Go to episode 720
dijs

Jim

“East-West”The Paul Butterfield Blues Band

We really do read your letters! After we first aired our interview with Jac Holzman, a listener wrote in saying he'd like to hear more about Paul Butterfield. So in response, Jim drops a track by The Paul Butterfield Blues Band into the Desert Island Jukebox. In 1966, on an album of the same name, the group recorded the song "East-West" written by guitarist/composer Mike Bloomfield. Bloomfield was influenced by blues, psychedelia, free jazz and Indian raga music. This track in turninfluenced everyone from the Grateful Dead to Joe Boyd. It's a landmark in rock, and it's goin' with Jim to the island. Gotta question, comment or suggestion? Contact us here.

Go to episode 486