Results for The Eagles

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Don Felder

Guitarist Don Felder joins Jim and Greg this week. Felder was a member of The Eagles from 1974-1980, and then again 1994-2001. He recently wrote a book about those years called Heaven and Hell: My Life in the Eagles, and Jim and Greg were eager to get the inside scoop on the notoriously contentious band. Felder, who played with Stephen Stills, Tom Petty and The Allmans prior to the Eagles, also reveals what it was like to pen a classic tune like "Hotel California." While the Eagles weren‘t improvisational, Felder credits learning jazz guitar with giving him the techniques necessary to play onstage and in the studio. Unfortunately those musical skills don’t help one survive life in a band.

Go to episode 154
news

Music News

AC/DC is following in the path of Garth Brooks, The Eagles and Journey. The veteran hard rock band inked a deal to sell its forthcoming album exclusively at Wal-Mart. This formula has been successful for bands in the past; The Eagles' Long Road Out of Eden sold almost 3 million copies, all without the help of a record company. But, AC/DC is still on Columbia Records, which makes Jim and Greg wonder about their motivation. They'll be curious to see how the profits break down between the band, their label and the retail store when the album is released this fall.

The latest in the line to follow the Radiohead record release model is Girl Talk, aka Gregg Gillis. The sample-based artist and former Sound Opinions guest is following up his underground hit Night Ripper with a new album due out soon. Like In Rainbows, Feed the Animals will be a pay-what-you-want release. But the real question is if Girl Talk will have to pay. The new album will have over 300 samples — none of which Gillis legally obtained. As more fans take notice of his work it's possible more lawyers will as well.

The godfather of soul passed away two years ago, but James Brown left behind a treasure trove of his earthly goods. Many of these items will be auctioned off at Christie's later this month. Who will reap the benefits of the sale is unclear due to the chaotic state of the singer's estate. But fans can get hold of such artifacts as Brown's Grammy and Kennedy Center Awards, his baby grand piano and Hammond organ, as well as personal notes and photos. Jim and Greg are most interested in all his grooming products though. Just imagine the hair magic Greg could produce with Brown's pick.

Go to episode 133

Music News

After 31 years at EMI, The Rolling Stones have moved over to Universal Music. The label is boasting about its acquisition, but Jim and Greg wonder if the Stones are such a catch after all. As a“heritage artist”they surely bring rock-cred to any company, but as former Chicago rock critic and NPR arts editor Bill Wyman points out, EMI only sold about a million Stones albums a year, which is about as much as a single Eagles album alone sold. A million records is certainly nothing to sneeze at, but it may not warrant the expense of housing such a band.

In other Stones news… Abkco Music Inc., the publishing company that owns the right to the British band's song "Play With Fire," is suing rapper Lil Wayne for what it claims was an unauthorized release of an altered version of the song. Lil Wayne's new track "Playing With Fire," does not list any samples in its credits, but Abkco believes the song is clearly derivative. You be the judge.

While it holds a place in the hearts of a generation of music fans, the cassette tape has almost gone the way of the 8-track. The New York Times recently published what is essentially an obituary of the cassette, pointing out the one area the technology still thrived was the audiobook industry. But now, even books on tape are being dumped. Add this to the fact that none of Billboard's Top 10 albums last week were issued on cassette, and it seems time to say goodbye to our dear friend.

Go to episode 140

Music News

For years the RIAA has been using the tactics of lawsuits and intimidation to try to curb illegal file-sharing, but recently both the consumer and the legal world are fighting back. Two prominent legal minds are calling for major copyright reform. The first is Harvard University law professor Charles Nesson, who has come to the defense of a Boston University student targeted in a music industry lawsuit. Nesson argues that as a private group, the RIAA can't carry out the civil enforcement of a criminal law and has vowed to take this case as far as it can go.

Another legal bigwig asking for reform is Marilyn Hall Patel, the judge who presided over the case that killed off original Napster. Seven years after her landmark decision, she hasn't seen the music industry make any strides to improve the situation and has proposed a new plan to create a new public/private organization with authority over the licensing and enforcement of copyrighting.

The words "Ticketmaster" and "Live Nation" are hard to escape these days, and with good reason. The two monoliths are unavoidable if you go to see concerts, and now that is the case with listening to and purchasing music as well. Jim and Greg discuss two new developments with the soon-to-be competitors. Ticketmaster has decided to be a little more customer-friendly with the next series of Eagles shows. They will reduce the convenience fees and waive delivery and handling fees for customers who print tickets at home. This decision comes after Eagles manager Irving Azoff was named the CEO of Ticketmaster Entertainment. Jim and Greg think this is a move in the right direction, but still find the price of Eagles tickets to be ridiculous.

Live Nation has also taken a new step. After inking a number of 360-degree deals with artists like U2, Madonna and Jay-Z, they now have plans to launch artist pages (similar to MySpace) pages where they can sell mp3s. This will essentially make Live Nation the world's biggest music store, and an even more powerful Live Nation is not something our hosts look forward to.

Go to episode 156

Music News

Two of the summer's biggest tours will not be coming to a city near you. Both U2 and Christina Aguilera have announced postponements, and the concert industry, and in particular Live Nation, will be taking a big hit. U2 alone was projected to bring in $200 million.

In other concert news, more cancellations have been announced in Arizona. A number of acts, including Pitbull and Cypress Hill, have taken the southwestern state off their schedule because of its controversial new immigration law. And even more artists are asking others to follow suit. Jim wonders if musicians might make a bigger impact by continuing to perform in Arizona and expressing their outrage live.

In New York, music fans will be experiencing some unique protection in the near future. Governor Paterson recently reminded ticket retailers like StubHub, that now that a 2007 scalping law has expired, a more restrictive law from the 1920s is back in effect. This law prevents ticket re-sellers, or scalpers, from raising the original price by more than $2. Good news for audiences, bad news for Ticketmaster.

Finally in the news, Jim and Greg remark on the absurdity of rock's V.I.P. ticket. Acts like Justin Bieber and The Eagles will be charging fans hundreds and hundreds of dollars for more access. Both our hosts miss the day when the biggest fan got to make it to the front row, not the biggest wallet.

Go to episode 235

Music News

Eminem is having a good week. He was not only announced as a headliner at this summer's Lollapalooza, but his Marshall Mathers LP 2 album hit the two million mark in sales. This puts him in the rarefied air of only one other artist in the SoundScan era. (The other is the Backstreet Boys.) His cumulative sales are approaching 50 million, making him the 2nd best-selling male artist of the SoundScan era behind Garth Brooks.

Irving Azoff is one of the most powerful men in the history of music. He managed careers of bands like The Eagles, Van Halen, andSteely Dan. He was also the CEO of Ticketmaster and the chairman of LiveNation. Now, he is has brokered a big deal involving…Phil Jackson? Azoff is a former partner of New York Knicks CEO James Dolan, and he told Bloomberg News that he helped broker the deal to bring Jackson to the Knicks. But, he can join Spike courtside whenever he wants.

Go to episode 435

Music News

The first story in the news this week is a sign of things to come according to Jim and Greg. They have been reporting on power shifts in the music industry for years, and now they're seeing two giants come together: Ticketmaster and Irving Azoff. For listeners not familiar with that second name, Azoff, a longtime tastemaker and power broker in the record business, is behind the careers of New Kids on the Block, Van Halen and Guns 'N Roses, and brokered the recent deals between AC/DC, The Eagles and Wal-Mart. Now he'll be helming Ticketmaster Entertainment, and Jim and Greg think consumers should beware.

The next two stories showcase two new ways the industry is trying to curb file-sharing. As reported on the show previously, the U.K. is going after Internet service providers, since no one has had much luck putting the fear in consumers. Now we know who will be heading this war on downloading: punk rocker Feargal Sharkey. The former Undertones lead singer is being unveiled as the chief executive of UK Music, an umbrella organization that will represent songwriters, promoters and other members of the music industry.

Back in the States, Universal Music has struck a deal with Dell Computers to provide consumers with a bundle of tunes along with their computer purchase. They believe that if people have legal music on their hard-drive, they won‘t try to get more illegally. But Jim and Greg don’t think this deal factors in the importance of choice. In 2008, with so many ways to hear and consume music, fans don't want label executives curating their listening for them.

A recent survey shows that indie labels still don't have access to radio airplay despite the FCC's effort to equal the playing field. Part of 2007's payola settlement was to insure that 8,400 half-hour segments of airtime should be dedicated to indie labels and local bands. This was to help cease any pay-for-play practices. But, organizations like The American Association of Independent Music and the Future of Music Coalition are saying that, unfortunately, things are as grim as ever.

Go to episode 153

Music News

Taylor Swift dominated 2014 with her album 1989, selling 3.6 million copies and narrowly beating out Disney's Frozen for the top spot. With only four records achieving platinum status, not even Queen Bey made the cut this year. 2014 also saw a change in how consumers listened to music, as streaming increased 54% and vinyl sales were at their highest since 1991.

Just when people thought they "forgot about Dre", it turns out he was the highest paid musician of 2014 according to Forbes. Dr. Dre made $620 million before taxes, which can be attributed to his success with Beats headphones and collaboration with Apple. In second place is Beyoncé. Rounding out the top five are boomer acts The Eagles, Bon Jovi and Bruce Springsteen.

For the first time in UK chart history, the ten best-selling albums of the year were British acts. Ed Sheeran, Sam Smith, Coldplay and One Direction all held prominent places on the list, perhaps signaling that there is another British invasion on the way.

vx2 Sony is reintroducing the Walkman to give music enthusiasts a new old obsession. This Walkman has 128 GB of memory and 60 hours of battery life, and the device is competing with Neil Young's Pono, another high-fidelity music player. Young says his device does not do anything but play music and argues that is what it all should be about.

Go to episode 476