Results for The Doors

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1967

Not to make you feel old, but it's been 45 years since the "Summer of Love," the year of the hippie, and some of the most influential music in rock history. So Jim and Greg have decided to look back at the watershed year 1967. Television viewers were treated to memorable performances by The Who, The Doors and The Rolling Stones. Aretha Franklin recorded her famous Atlantic release "Respect." Fans from around the country gathered in California for the Monterey International Pop Music Festival. But during this episode Jim and Greg focus on the single LP's that changed the way people thought of the studio and a collection of songs. 1967 gave birth to the idea of album as art.

Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club band is, of course, the most prominent example of studio innovation on album in '67. Recorded at Abbey Road by George Martin on mono, stereo and four-track recorders, Sgt. Pepper's was a critical and commercial success. But, as they stated during our Revolver Classic Album Dissection, Jim and Greg don‘t think it’s The Beatles‘ best. Nor is it the best album of that year. They’d point people to the landmark recordings The Piper at the Gates of Dawn by Pink Floyd, Forever Changes by Love and The Velvet Underground and Nico by The Velvet Underground. Jim and Greg talk about these albums' innovations in terms of recording and artistic ambition. They also hear from Joe Boyd, who produced Pink Floyd's first single in 1967 and Jac Holzman, who discovered Love and signed them to Elektra.

Go to episode 323
dijs

Jim & Greg

“The Red Telephone”Love

Last week, Arthur Lee, the singer and guitarist for the psychedelic rock band Love, died of leukemia at the age of 61. Jim and Greg explain how Lee was one of the most important figures of the psychedelic era. He influenced bands like The Doors, The Byrds, and even the other great African-American psychedelic rocker of the day: Jimi Hendrix. His masterpiece, Forever Changes, also influenced contemporary "orchestral pop" artists like The Arcade Fire and The Polyphonic Spree. Lee was a pioneer, but a largely unheralded one. This may have been the musician's own doing, since he was a rather dark, eccentric figure. But, while Lee certainly had many troubled years, Jim and Greg believe his music deserves to be celebrated. To pay tribune to Arthur Lee, our hosts highlight a song off of Forever Changes. They both add "The Red Telephone" to the Desert Island Jukebox.

Go to episode 37

Greg

“Shake the Dope Out”The Warlocks

Ray Manzarek's death gets Greg thinking about bands that have carried The Doors' dark L.A. aesthetic into the present day. For his DIJ, he goes with The Warlocks' 2002 album Phoenix. It wasn‘t just The Warlocks’ lyrics that were dark, he says, it was also their music. As many as ten players contributed to the band's moody, wall-of-sound onstage. The lyrics to "Shake the Dope Out" could be about drugs, but Greg thinks they could also be referring to the overwhelming feeling of the band's music.

Go to episode 391
lists

Songs About First Impressions

Whether or not you believe in love at first sight, there's something exciting about laying eyes on someone special for the first time. Jim and Greg share their favorite songs about first impressions.

Go to episode 585
news

Music News

Live Nation has already conquered this continent, and now they have their sights on our neighbors to the south. The biggest concert promoters in North America just struck a deal with the biggest concert promoters in Latin America, CIE. The arrangement gives Live Nation the exclusive right to book world tours into CIE venues. This means they've got their paws on nearly all the major concert halls and arenas in Mexico, and a big chunk of those in Brazil. CIE sees the deal as a way to get access to all the major talent in the world, that is, of course, assuming Madonna, Shakira and Jay-Z fill your talent quota.

Next time you want to“Do the Dew,”that could mean popping on some headphones. Soda company Mountain Dew just started a new music company, Green Label, that will release free exclusive downloads by artists like Cool Kids and Matt and Kim. To music fans wary of these kind of corporate relationships, Cool Kid Chuck Inglish explains that the company is just trying to support music, not sell their products. Jim is not convinced, but Greg responds that these days an artist needs support wherever he can get it.

The last news item this week concerns The Doors' long time legal drama. The California Supreme Court just denied a petition by two surviving members of the band, Ray Manzarek and Robby Krieger, to review a lower court's decision that blocked them from touring under The Doors' name. Manzarek and Krieger added“of the 21st Century,”but still continued to use images of the late Jim Morrison in their advertising. Now they'll have to pay up to the third surviving member John Densmore, as well as Morrison's family.

Go to episode 144

Music News

Last week over 125 million viewers worldwide watched Emmelie de Forest of Denmark take the top prize in the Eurovision Song Contest. The 58th edition of the televised songfest was held in the home of former contestants Abba. But perhaps more interesting than the pop music, is the geopolitical tensions. For example, Russia claims its entry at the finals was pushed into a fifth place as a consequence of vote-stealing in Azerbaijan, leading to tension between the countries. Germany, too, is unhappy with its showing, blaming the euro zone crisis and Chancellor Angela Merkel's austerity measures.

Our own pop music contest, American Idol, wrapped up its 12th season and crowned Candice Gloverthe winner. But, while her cover of "Lovesong" was a highlight, the season itself was a low point for Fox. Ratings dropped 44% from last year, and total viewership plummeted by 7 million. Compared with NBC competitor The Voice, Greg thinks the show has become your grandparents' American Idol and wonders if anyone will care about poor Candice like they once did Kelly.

At the end of the news Jim and Greg bid farewell to The Doors co-founder Ray Manzarek. The keyboard player died Monday at age 74. And as Greg explains, he was integral to creating the band's iconic dark, L.A. sound. He brought in elements from his southside Chicago upbringing, as well as his classical and jazz training. You can hear that in The Doors' famous track "Riders on the Storm."

Go to episode 391

Music News

The first story in the news this week involves that age-old practice of“pay-for-play,”or payola, in the music industry. In recent years, New York Attorney General Eliot Spitzer has been investigating major record labels like Sony and Warner who engaged in this practice. But now, the FCC has joined the battle against this unethical behavior by launching an investigation of the four major radio corporations: Clear Channel Communications, CBS Radio, Citadel Broadcasting and Entercom Communications. The FCC's enforcement unit is looking into accusations that broadcasters illegally accepted cash or other compensation in exchange for airplay of specific songs without telling listeners. As per usual, the federal government is late to the game — but this investigation is admittance of a problem. And as we all know, that's the first step.

Also making news recently are some major acts from the early 1990s. It seems that people are already nostalgic for the music of the alternative era, and many of the surviving bands are cashing in on it. Alice in Chains announced tour dates for this summer, despite the fact that their original lead singer, Layne Staley, died of a drug overdose in 2002. Like the members of Queen and The Doors, the surviving Alice in Chains bandmates don't seem fazed by this loss, and will continue with the addition of Guns 'N Roses bassist Duff McKagan and Comes With the Fall vocalist William DuVall. Former Jane's Addiction members Dave Navarro and Stephen Perkins will also tour this summer under the name Panic Channel, though their lead singer has not passed on. Rather, he's now the impresario of what may prove this summer's big moneymaker: Lollapalooza.

In the typical fashion, Neil Young is stirring up some controversy. The prolific rocker finished recording music for an upcoming album mere days ago and will have it in stores within a couple of weeks. Young is just coming off his last release, Prairie Wind (featured in Jonathan Demme's recent concert film), but on Living With War, he will shift gears completely. According to Greg, this release is a completely political, guerilla-style protest album. Young wrote and recorded songs like "Let's Impeach the President," in just one day in response to the current administration and its failed war in Iraq. Jim points out that Young works well in this situation. Less than two weeks after the Kent State shootings in 1970, Young was inspired to write "Ohio," and it was on the radio within a week. Almost 40 years later, the classic rock icon shows no sign of slowing down — neither his writing, nor his politics.

Nirvana and The Smashing Pumpkins are also in the headlines again. Nirvana widow Courtney Love sold 25% of her share of the band's publishing rights to Larry Mestel, a former executive at Virgin Music. She reportedly received over 50 million dollars for this settlement. That should help alleviate Love's financial woes, though not necessarily the woes of Nirvana fans who worry that Cobain's legacy will be boiled down to Teen Spirit ads. Smashing Pumpkins fans are also a bit curious about the fate of that band. Lead singer (and Love ex) Billy Corgan has stated that the Chicago group will reunite, but no one is quite sure in what incarnation. That really just leaves Pearl Jam, who you'll hear about later in the show.

Go to episode 22

Music News

This episode of Sound Opinions starts out with a discussion of the recent phenomenon overtaking many rock groups: Bands like The Doors, Queen, Journey, and The Cars are touring and making albums despite the fact that their original lead singers are no longer with them. This is not a new phenomenon, however. Jim and Greg have both seen this before with The Four Tops, The Platters, and more recently, Judas Priest, whose story inspired the movie Rock Star.

One of the most heavily publicized instances of a band replacing its lead singer is with the group INXS. In order to cast another Michael Hutchence, INXS's original lead singer who committed suicide in 1997, the Australian bandmates went so far as to utilize reality television. In Rock Star INXS, hundreds of wannabes vied for this slot. The winner was JD Roth, whose single with INXS is currently getting a fair amount of radio play. The runner-up is Chicago musician Marty Casey. To get to the bottom of the substitute lead-singer phenomenon, Jim and Greg sit down with Casey, whose band The Lovehammers is opening up for Roth and INXS on their current tour.

Go to episode 7