Results for The Allman Brothers Band

interviews

Alan Paul on The Allman Brothers Band

This year The Allman Brothers Band will celebrate its 45th anniversary, and sources say this year may be the band's last. In fact, due to Greg Allman's bronchitis, it remains to be seen when the band can close out its residency at the famed Beacon Theater in New York. But, after four decades, fans still shelled out upwards of $6,000 to get a ticket to the Beacon gigs. The Allmans still captivate, and for good reason, according to Alan Paul. He's a senior writer at Guitar World and the author of the New York Times bestselling biography One Way Out: The Inside History of The Allman Brothers Band. Alan talks with Jim and Greg about the band's unique mix of blues, jazz, country and psychedelic rock, and their quintessntially American lineup, in which bigger was better. The Allman Brothers Band had two guitartists, Duane Allman and Dickey Betts, and two drummers, Butch Trucks and Jaimoe Johansen. Rounding out the group at its formation was bassist Berry Oakley. But since 1969, there have been a number of personnel changes and dramatic ups and downs, including the loss of Duane only two years years into the band's lifespan. But, despite all odds, as Alan explains, The Allman Brothers Band has maintained its vision and its soul (except for that whole keytar incident).

Go to episode 435
dijs

Greg

“Statesboro Blues”the Allman Brothers Band

After a number of deaths of high-profile drummers in recent weeks, Greg now pays tribute to Butch Trucks, who died of a self-inflicted gunshot wound on January 24. A founding member of the Allman Brothers Band, Trucks remained in the group for its entire 45-year span. He formed one of the best rhythm sections in rock alongside fellow drummer Jai Johanny“Jaimoe”Johanson. While Jaimoe provided the jazzy accents, Trucks was the freight train, with a command of the blues vocabulary. According to Greg, the best example of Trucks's blues shuffle is on a 1971 live recording of "Statesboro Blues," so it gets its slot in the Desert Island Jukebox.

Go to episode 588
features

In Memoriam: Gregg Allman

Gregg Allman Musician Gregg Allman died May 27 at the age of 69. Gregg was a crucial member of The Allman Brothers Band, a group at the forefront of the southern rock genre, though they didn‘t like to be labeled as such. The band’s combined the blues, jazz, rock and psychedelia to make for a original sound. Gregg was the voice of the band, the organ player and the primary songwriter, writing hits like "Midnight Rider," "Whipping Post" and "Melissa." Greg Kot pays tribute to Gregg Allman with a track that's actually a demo called "Dreams."“Dreams”was the song that first helped the band take him seriously as a songwriter.

Go to episode 601
news

Music News

A couple of President Donald Trump's first executive actions have some musicians worried about their art and their livelihoods. This week President Trump tapped Ajit Pai as the next chairman of the Federal Communications Commission. The pick has indepent music labels and artists worried about the future of net neutrality rules. Net neutrality is the practice of requiring internet service providers to treat all wesbties and apps equally, and not provide premium services for individual companies. For example, allowing for quicker access to one music streaming service, while slowing down another. Pai is a noted critic of net neutrality and feels the regulations get in the way of innovation. He recently said it was time to take a "weed whacker" to net neutrality. Additionally, the Hill recently reported that President Trump's budget may eliminate funding for the National Endowment for the Arts. That organization provides funding for artistic endeavors including music.

Go to episode 583