Results for Thank You (Falettinme Be Mice Elf Agin)

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Favorite Literary Rock songs

Recently Jim and Greg were invited to speak at Washington College in Maryland about the relationship between rock and literature. They were eager to share some of their discussion this week on the show…and play music! While pop music doesn‘t get taken as seriously as the great novels of our time, for critics like Jim and Greg and for music fans, it’s as important a“text”as any other. Literary rock can mean multiple things — great rock criticism, poetic lyrics and even songs inspired by literature and poetic lyrics. Here are some of Jim and Greg's favorite Literary Rock songs:

  • Roxy Music, "In Every Dream Home a Heartbreak"
  • The Rolling Stones, "Sympathy for the Devil"
  • Patti Smith, "Gloria"
  • Cannibal Ox, "Iron Galaxy"
  • The Kinks, "The Village Green Preservation Society"**
  • Sly and the Family Stone, "Thank You (Falettinme Be Mice Elf Agin)"
  • Blur, "Parklife"

**Ray Davies fans should check out his 2008 visit to the show.

Go to episode 176

Songs of Thanks

'Tis the season to hold family and friends close and be thankful for what we have. Jim and Greg share some of their favorite "song of thanks," tracks that highlight gratefulness and appreciation.

Go to episode 626
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Music News

"All the squares, go home!" Cynthia Robinson, famed trumpeter for Sly and the Family Stone, has passed away at the age of 71 from cancer. Robinson, a former guest on Sound Opinions, moved from flute to clarinet before ultimately becoming one of the great trumpet players in rock. She was childhood friends with Sly Stone and co-founded Sly and the Stoners with him in the mid-'60s. That band would become Sly and the Family Stone, scoring huge hits like "Dance to the Music," "Everyday People," and "Thank You (Falettinme Be Mice Elf Agin)". According to Greg, not only was the band groundbreaking musically in its mix of rock, funk, and soul, but he also credits its biracial co-ed makeup for embodying the counterculture better than any other band. As tribute to the great Cynthia Robinson, they play "Underdog," an early horn feature from 1967.

Go to episode 523