Results for Rush

interviews

Rush

rush Jim gets to unleash his inner thirteen-year-old this week as he and Greg sit down with Alex Lifeson and Geddy Lee of the Canadian prog-rock legends Rush. All three members of Rush are known for their ridiculous virtuosity on their instruments – drum god Neil Peart, Lifeson on guitar, and Geddy Lee, who manages to play bass and synths and sing simultaneously. Lee and Lifeson met in junior high in Ontario and released a couple hard rock albums with drummer John Rutsey in the early '70s. But the band really hit its stride when Rutsey was replaced by Neil Peart, who also became the primary lyricist. They began crafting epic progressive rock concept albums like 2112 and Hemispheres featuring side-length sci-fi suites. The albums Permanent Waves and Moving Pictures brought Rush radio hits in the early '80s, and the band moved into a synth-driven phase. Over the ensuing decades, Rush has continued to evolve its sound and adapt to new styles, while growing a cult fanbase that is intense to say the least. The band just celebrated its 40th anniversary with a tour and live album called R40 Live. Geddy Lee and Alex Lifeson discuss the band's evolving styles, the existence of female Rush fans, and whether the band will continue.

Go to episode 535
reviews
Snakes & ArrowsSnakes and Arrows available on iTunes

Rush Snakes and Arrows

After much prodding, Jim finally convinced Greg to slate Rush's new album Snakes and Arrows as the record review for this week. And listeners who enjoy a good session of Kot vs. DeRogatis won't be disappointed. Sound Opinions fan know that Jim has a soft spot for the classic progressive rock band, and this week he declares drummer and chief songwriter Neil Peart the greatest drummer living today. He even compares watching Peart drum to what he imagines it would be like to watch God create the Grand Canyon. The question now is whether or not the band, which had its heyday in the 1970s, is still relevant. Jim argues that they are, and gives the album a Buy It. Greg thinks all the classic Rush elements are on the album, including the massive drumming and Geddy Lee's high pitched vocals, but it's Peart's overly-philosophical lyrics he takes issue with. Greg wonders where the passion is, and can only give Snakes and Arrows a Burn It.

JimGreg
Go to episode 77
Teeth DreamsTeeth Dreams available on iTunes

The Hold Steady Teeth Dreams

Minneapolis-born, Brooklyn-bred Beat-rockers The Hold Steady have undergone a few changes since their 2009 visit to Sound Opinions. The band took a break after the departure of keyboardist (and moustache idol) Franz Nicolay, while frontman Craig Finn put out a solo album. Now the boys are back, with an extra guitarist, Steve Selvidge, and a sixth album called Teeth Dreams. It's their first venture with producer Nick Raskulinecz (best known for his work with Foo Fighters, Rush, and Evanesence), and as Greg points out, their sound is“slicker”than ever. Perhaps too slick — while the band can still rock, the album is bogged down with slow, melodramatic experimentation. Greg has to say Try It. Jim scoffs at the lyricist's literary bent — with Finn so obviously ripping off Raymond Chandler and Jack Kerouac, this host has to wonder if it's parody. Regardless, Jim prefers The Hold Steady live, in their bombastic, Springsteen-ian element — as for Teeth Dreams, it's a Trash It.

JimGreg
Go to episode 436
10,000 Days

Tool 10,000 Days

On a completely different note, progressive metal band Tool also has a new album out. 10,000 Days is the band's fourth album, and it debuted at number one on the Billboard Chart. Tool's commercial success is surprising considering the band's lack of self-promotion: They rarely get radio or MTV play, seldom do interviews, and perform practically in darkness. They are almost anonymous, yet have a huge cult following. Jim and Greg imagine this is because of the band's progressive rock vibe. They appeal to fans (especially teenagers) who love complete albums and desire to spend hours and hours mulling over one band's work. But, Jim points out, unlike prog rock groups like Rush and Genesis, Tool's music is lacking hooks. It's nü-metal side kind of ruins the package for Jim and Greg. Therefore, despite the fun 3-D packaging, 10,000 Days only gets a Trash It from Greg and an reticent Burn It from Jim.

JimGreg
Go to episode 24
dijs

Jim

“Trees”Rush

Jim picks a song to add to the Desert Island Jukebox this week. All that talk about Canada got him thinking about one of his favorite bands—Rush. This band might not always get a lot of respect, but Jim believes they gave virtuoso prog rock performances. He chooses not to go with one of Rush's epic songs, which could take up half a show, and instead picks a track called "Trees." This song, released on the band's 1978 album Hemispheres, tells the story of a battle of the wills between maple trees and oak trees. If that doesn‘t convince you of the band’s greatness, listen for drummer Neal Peart's woodblock solo!

Go to episode 13
lists

The Best of 2007… So Far

Jim and Greg just couldn‘t wait until the end of the year to start picking their favorite albums, so they’ve decided to name their 2007 mid-year best.

Go to episode 81

Guest Desert Island Jukebox

Jim and Greg usually monopolize the desert island jukebox playing tracks they can‘t live without. But this week, they’re handing out quarters to some of the talented guests that have appeared on the show, so they can share the songs they'd take with them if stranded out at sea.

  • Moby, Cat Stevens, "Peace Train" and The Beatles, "Let It Be"
  • Mary J. Blige, Stevie Wonder, Songs in the Key of Life
  • Sleater-Kinney, Sam Cooke, Greatest Hits: Sam Cooke, Television, Marquee Moon, Tears for Fears, Songs From The Big Chair
  • Shamir, Wolf Alice, "Lisbon"
  • Rush, Buffalo Springfield, "For What It's Worth" and The Who, Who's Next
  • Herb Alpert, Miles Davis, Kind of Blue
  • Bob Mould, The Beatles, Revolver (in mono)
  • L.A. Reid, Steely Dan, "Haitian Divorce"
Go to episode 590
news

Music News

Changes are afoot at Cleveland's Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Not only will Donna Summer, Rush, and Public Enemy take their places in the Hall this April, but the institution also has a new CEO. Greg Harris started his career at the Baseball Hall of Fame, and assumed the Rock Hall's top job this January. The appointment earned him a shout-out from none other than The Roots' drummer Questlove, who whiled away his youth combing the bins at Harris's record store, the Philadelphia Record Exchange. Harris talks to Jim and Greg about the Rock Hall's notoriously-secretive induction process, why he doesn't mind Johnny Rotten bashing the Hall, and why Rush fans are the most polite fans in rock.

Go to episode 381
world tours

Canada

Justin Bieber

Every once in a while, Jim and Greg embark on the Sound Opinions World Tour and explore the music of another country. This week felt like a fine time to turn to our neighbor to the north and look at the music coming out of Canada today. As their guide, they're joined by music critic Ben Rayner of the the Toronto Star. Ben takes them from Montreal's experimental/electronic scene to the noise-pop of Halifax to the country's growing hip-hop culture. He also explains how the government supports pop music via grants and the "Cancon" regulations requiring broadcasters to air a certain amount of Canadian music. Ben also recommends two up-and-coming Canadian artists: Inuk throat singer Tanya Tagaq and Acadian folk-rocker Lisa LeBlanc.

Jim and Greg also dig through the Sound Opinions archives and share their favorite performances and interviews from Canadian artists, including a stripped down song from Montreal's Arcade Fire, a conversation with Toronto's Feist from early in her career, and a performance from the Vancouver supergroup The New Pornographers. Plus, they revisit their conversation with the most Canadian of all bands: Rush.

Go to episode 572