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reviews
Pocket SymphonyPocket Symphony available on iTunes

Air Pocket Symphony

The French electronic duo Air gets the next review. Jean-Benoît Dunckel and Nicolas Godin got notice stateside with albums like Moon Safari and appearances on the Virgin Suicides soundtrack. Now they are back with their fourth album, Pocket Symphony, which was produced by Nigel Godrich. Jarvis Cocker of Pulp also makes an appearance. Greg thinks this release is more challenging than previous Air albums. He thinks the duo owes a great deal to Phillip Glass, but wishes they had introduced more of their light, pop touches. For Greg, the men of Air are better as producers than as frontmen. He gives it a Trash It. Jim calls Greg's analysis“cracked,”and thinks the combination of ambient and pop is just perfect. He gives it a Buy It.

JimGreg
Go to episode 68
lists

Unrequited Love Songs

What would rock ‘n’ roll be if not for the thousands of songs about love and heartbreak? Jim and Greg explore this legacy for this week's Valentine's Day episode featuring the best Unrequited Love Songs:

Go to episode 272

Secret Love Songs for Valentine's Day

secret As Aimee Mann once sung, "Hush Hush, keep it down now…voices carry!" But despite that plea and desire for secrecy, musicians have been coming clean about their loving feelings since the beginning of the rock era. So to celebrate Valentine's Day this year, Jim and Greg reveal their favorite "Secret Love Songs." These could be admissions of an illicit romance, expressions of forbidden emotions or professions of a secret crush. Enjoy (but keep it on the down-low).

Go to episode 480

Songs About First Impressions

Whether or not you believe in love at first sight, there's something exciting about laying eyes on someone special for the first time. Jim and Greg share their favorite songs about first impressions.

Go to episode 585
news

Music News

This year's Mercury Prize winner has just been announced. The Arctic Monkeys will take home the British music prize, following in the footsteps of PJ Harvey, Dizzee Rascal, Badly Drawn Boy and Pulp. The prize is usually awarded to a non-commercial artist as an alternative to the more mainstream Brit Awards. Jim suggests that the U.S. equivalent would fall between the Grammy Awards and the more-eclectic Village Voice Pazz and Jop Critics Poll. The Arctic Monkeys were a surprising choice because they were perhaps the most obvious candidates. To say they were a huge phenomenon in the U.K. is an understatement — their album, Whatever People Say I Am, That's What I'm Not, was the fastest selling debut album in UK history. However, despite high profile appearances on Saturday Night Live and at the SXSW Music Conference in Austin, they did not wow American audiences on the same level. But Jim and Greg both gave the record a Buy It rating in their review.

Also making headlines is soul legend Ronald Isley. The Isley Brother, also known as“Mr. Biggs,”has been convicted of tax evasion. He was sentenced to three years in federal prison and ordered to pay $3.1 million to the I.R.S — the maximum sentence he could have received. Jim and Greg had hoped that the judge would show some leniency to the musician, who recently suffered a stroke and a bout with kidney cancer, and is expecting a baby in January. Our hosts also cite Isley as one of the great talents of our time, noting that he has had a major hit in every one of his six decades as a performer. They suggest that it is Isley's friend, R. Kelly, who deserves the harsh hand of the law.

While“Mr. Biggs”can stay“Mr. Biggs,”even in prison,“Diddy”can no longer be“Diddy”in the U.K. The artist formerly known as P. Diddy, Puffy, Puff Daddy, and Sean Combs has agreed to drop the Diddy name as part of a legal settlement with a London-based producer named Richard“Diddy”Dearlove. Diddy became Diddy in 2001, but Dearlove had a hit under the name in 1997. Combs, however, announced that he can now add a new name to the list: Diddy is going to be a daddy.

Go to episode 42