Results for Pet Sounds

classic album dissections
Pet Sounds (Mono Version)Pet Sounds available on iTunes

The Beach Boys Pet Sounds

On May 16, 1966, The Beach Boys released their 11th studio album, Pet Sounds. It was a relative commercial failure for what was the biggest American band of the '60s. However in the ensuing 50 years, the album's stature grew. Today, its influence pervades to the point that it is almost universally acknowledged as one of the greatest albums ever released in the rock era. With Beach Boys mastermind Brian Wilson taking the album on tour again this summer, Jim and Greg feel it's the perfect time to give Pet Sounds a Classic Album Dissection.

Due to a great deal of pressure, emotional turmoil, and mental health issues, Brian Wilson quit the Beach Boys as a touring entity at the end of 1964. While the rest of the band was on the road, Wilson spent ten months in the studio crafting one of the most intricate and expensive pop records ever made. Working with the famed session musicians of the Wrecking Crew, Wilson took a classical composer's approach, layering instrument upon instrument to create lush, unique timbres. He collaborated with Madison Avenue writer Tony Asher on heartbreakingly earnest lyrics about his struggles to find his place in the world. The audience, the label, and his own bandmates didn't quite know what to make of Pet Sounds when it came out. But artists from The Beatles to R.E.M. to Radiohead picked up on its brilliance and modeled their own music on Wilson's ingenious arrangements. God only knows what rock would be today without Pet Sounds.

Go to episode 546
reviews
That Lucky Old SunThat Lucky Old Sun available on iTunes

Brian Wilson That Lucky Old Sun

One musician who always seems to be buried, followed by an unearthing, is Brian Wilson. The former Beach Boy has had so many comebacks, Jim and Greg aren‘t even sure where he’s coming back from. Is Brian back again with this new record, That Lucky Old Sun? Greg explains that some people are saying this album is on par with Wilson's two masterpieces, Pet Sounds and Smile. But this critic thinks that's an insult to his previous efforts. He finds this album nostalgic, but takes too long to become emotionally resonant. And, the songs are weighed down by cornball lyrics courtesy of Van Dyke Parks. Jim completely agrees and wonders if the troubled artist actually made this record. If he did, he's merely cashing in. If he didn‘t, it’s quite a con. Either way That Lucky Old Sun gets a double Trash It.

JimGreg
Go to episode 147
SmileSmile available on iTunes

Brian Wilson Smile

Beach Boys fans have been waiting over forty years for Brian Wilson's lost record, Smile. Now we can finally hear those abandoned recordings from 1967 on the Smile Sessions. But as Jim explains, a lost album usually deserves to stay that way. He doesn‘t hear any of the emotion that made Wilson’s masterpiece Pet Sounds so wonderful. And the studio experimentation is more mess than art. The Smile Sessions detract from the Beach Boys legacy, according to Jim, so he says Trash It. Greg would‘ve expected different from a Syd Barrett fan. He hears a lot of idiosyncratic whimsy. Sure, it’s not as emotional as Pet Sounds, but it's a“fascinating curio”and successful song cycle. Greg says Buy It.

JimGreg
Go to episode 314
lists

Rock's Best Lead-Off Tracks

This week's show is dedicated to the true rock geeks out there. Continuing in the tradition of "Track 1, Side 1" Jim and Greg take the discussion into the post-vinyl age. What songs best kick-off an album? Here are their picks for the best Lead-Off Tracks of all time:

Go to episode 92
news

Music News

Exile on Main Street is widely considered The Rolling Stones' best album and one of the best albums of all time. Jim and Greg would agree. So, it's no surprise that fans have been clamoring for even the smallest extra bit of insight into the making of the record. Unfortunately, the new Exile reissue does not deliver that. It comes with a deluxe edition of the album, bonus tracks, a documentary DVD and a book, but nothing that would allow a fan to penetrate the mysterious, drug-filled recording sessions. It's merely a big tease, say Jim and Greg, and nothing approaching the successful model of reissues established by Pet Sounds and Funhouse.

Go to episode 233