Results for Norway

interviews

Powerhouse Sound

This week Jim and Greg welcomed Powerhouse Sound, a veritable who's who of avant garde jazz and rock musicians. Ken Vandermark, world-renowned reeds player and MacArthur Genius grant winner, assembled this bi-coastal motley crew to experiment with fusing jazz, rock, funk, blues and reggae. With him on the U.S. side of this project is bass player Nate McBride, as well as drummer John Herndon and guitarist Jeff Parker of the group Tortoise. The group has a new album out comprised of recordings done both here and in Norway entitled Oslo/Chicago Breaks.

Ken explains to Jim and Greg that the idea for Powerhouse Sound was inspired by Miles Davis' experiments with blending jazz and popular music. In the 1970s, Davis began working with a diverse group of musicians to create an improvisational sound that is as much funk as it is jazz. Greg notes that this was a heavily controversial period for Davis; jazz purists saw it as a commercial sell out. But, like Davis, the members of Powerhouse Sound are not interested in boundaries and musical dogma. The sound is the key. You can hear this freedom in their performance of "Shocklee/Broken Numbers." Check out the piece in its entirety here.

Go to episode 114

Jenny Hval

Jenny Hval Jim and Greg are joined this week by the talented Norwegian multidisciplinary artist Jenny Hval. After a stint fronting a gothic-metal band in Norway, she moved to Australia for college and began developing her voice as a songwriter. After returning to Norway, she released her first two albums (To Sing You Apple Trees in 2006 and Medea in 2008) under the stage name Rockettothesky. But beginning with 2011's Viscera, Jenny Hval has been recording under her own name. In addition to her six albums, she has also published two novels in Norwegian and has designed sound installations and performance art pieces.

Jenny Hval's most recent album Blood Bitch found a place in Jim's top ten list for 2016. As she explains, the record is a concept album tying together themes of vampirism, the female body, and the life of a touring musician. Jenny Hval speaks with Jim and Greg about writing the album, finding inspiration in the Arp Odyssey synthesizer, absorbing horror soundtracks, and rejecting the stereotypical persona of the female singer-songwriter.

Go to episode 600
dijs

Jim

“10,000 Lovers”Ida Maria

While recently scouring the Bermuda Triangle for long-lost artists, Jim rediscovered Norway's Ida Maria who specializes in energetic punk rock blended with new wave melodies. The song "10,000 Lovers" from Maria's second album Katla is a little less punk, but still a lot of fun and reminded Jim why Maria's debut album Fortress Round My Heart in 2009 was his favorite of that year. 10,000 Lovers features Maria's first use of her native Norwegian on a song, and while Jim doesn‘t understand any of it, there’s no mistaking Maria's shout-out to Frank Sinatra at the end.

Go to episode 437
news

Music News

After much debate, France has passed its three strikes law against filesharers. That means that if you are caught illegally downloading three times your internet could be shut down. It also signals an alliance between the French government and the record industry, and according to the EU, a limiting of personal freedom.

Speaking of limited personal freedom, the Chinese government continues to hinder access to popular music. Eager to curb potential protests, China's Ministry of Culture has cancelled major Oasis shows and moved the major MIDI festival from centrally located Beijing. Jim is not usually a fan of censorship, but actually favors an Oasis crackdown.

While we in this country have been busy with American Idol, Europeans were anxiously anticipating the winner of the biggest song contest in the world. This year's Eurovision winner is Alexander Rybeck of Norway. More than 100 million people watched his song "Fairytale" take the crown. Of course, Jim and Greg don‘t take this contest too seriously, but it’s nice to know that the love of schlock pop is universal.

Alexander Rybak

Go to episode 182

Music News

One of the biggest court decisions regarding file-sharing and piracy came down this week. The organizers of the site Pirate Bay were sentenced by a Swedish court to pay $3.6 million dollars and spend a year in prison. The defendants claim they merely provide a menu of available media, including music files, movies and software. But a judge and jury has deemed them pirates. Pirate Bay is fighting back, but meanwhile Jim and Greg point out that hindering file-sharing might actually hinder sales. A new study out of Norway says that people who illegally share music via P2P networks are overwhelmingly more likely to purchase music. Rather than stealing, the record companies might want to look at this kind of consumption as sampling.

One place you can sample free music is MySpace.com. The social networking site has quickly become the go-to place to promote your band and discover new music. That said, it's yet to make any serious cash. The newly revamped MySpace Music site is attempting to do just that with the addition of tour and release information, as well as links to purchase music. If MySpace stays on this path, it will essentially be like a 360 record label a la Live Nation.

Go to episode 178

Music News

Norway announced it will become the first country to switch off FM Radio. The FM signal will be discontinued on January 11, 2017 and will shepherd in a digital a trend in Europe. Norway's Minister of Culture says the move will save the country $25 million a year.

The IFPI or International Federation of the Phonographic Industry, released a report called“Record Industry in Numbers”documenting the state of the music sales in 2014. Among the takeaways is that physical product is not dead, especially overseas. For example, in Japan and Germany, physical sales were 78% and 70% of overall sales. Also, global vinyl sales were up a massive 55% from 2013. Latin America was a growth sector for the industry: with digital revenues were up 32%, and even China, a hotbed of music piracy, showed promise when it came to legal sales.

Go to episode 491