Results for Nebraska

interviews

Cursive

Greg and Jim took a trip out to Omaha, Nebraska to hang out with post-hardcore indie rockers Cursive. Performing live from The Waiting Room, the band serves up some brand new songs that have yet to be put to record. Tim Kasher talks with Jim and Greg about how he has recently added screenplay writing to his resume, in addition to his side project, The Good Life. Kasher thinks out loud about being a 33-year-old rocker with a teenage fan base, and shares what it means to him to be a songwriter. Though typically remembered for The Ugly Organ, Cursive feels content amidst evolving styles and lineups, and look forward to creating their as-yet-unnamed sixth studio album for Saddle Creek.

Go to episode 133
reviews
Cassadaga (Remastered)Cassadaga available on iTunes

Bright Eyes Cassadaga

Up next Jim and Greg review Conor Oberst's latest Bright Eyes album, Cassadaga. The Nebraska artist is only 27 years old, but has been making music for almost half his life. His last two Bright Eyes albums, which were released by Saddle Creek Records on the same day, sold a combined 642,000 copies — a major feat for an artist who gets no commercial radio or MTV play and who won't play at Live Nation venues. Jim jokes that many people have branded Oberst "the new Bob Dylan," a terrible cliché in rock criticism. If that's the case, this is Bright Eyes' Basement Tapes album. Oberst's lyrics are entirely too earnest and "emo" for Jim, but he really enjoys the beautiful, well-constructed melodies on Cassadaga. Therefore, he gives the album a Burn It. Greg agrees that Oberst can be a“drama queen”at times, but notes that the singer did bring down the vocal ticks and histrionics a notch on this collection of songs. He seems more at ease on these songs and agrees with Jim's Basement Tapes analogy. But, for Greg, the lyrics have not improved and are as clich'ed and overwrought as ever. He can only give it a Burn It.

JimGreg
Go to episode 73
We Shall Overcome (The Seeger Sessions) [American Land Edition]We Shall Overcome: The Seeger Sessions available on iTunes

Bruce Springsteen We Shall Overcome: The Seeger Sessions

Sound Opinions listeners know they can always count on a heated conversation when it comes to The Boss. Bruce Springsteen came out with a new album this week (the 18th of his career), We Shall Overcome: The Seeger Sessions. This time around, the singer pays tribute to folk artist Pete Seeger, and Jim and Greg completely disagree on whether or not it is worth your time. Greg became a Springsteen fan early on, but has been disappointed in his rock hero in recent years. However, he asserts that We Shall Overcome is Springsteen's best album since Nebraska. He appreciates the more down-to-earth production style and political messages of the songs. He gives it a Buy It rating. Jim, on the other hand, states that this record literally makes him sick to his stomach. He has never been a Springsteen fan, but has occasionally given a favorable review to albums like Devils in Dust. He finds this Seeger tribute musically and lyrically conservative, and basically just completely pathetic. He does not want to hear Springsteen do folk songs ("Froggie Went a Courtin'," anyone?) and wishes that Springsteen followed in the path of Billy Bragg and Wilco, who paid homage to another folk hero, Woody Guthrie. Unlike that album, this one gets a Trash It from Mr. DeRogatis.

JimGreg
Go to episode 22
features

C.W. McCall's "Convoy"

Convoy C.W. McCall had a surprise #1 hit in 1976 with the novelty country song "Convoy," sparking a global C.B. radio craze. But C.W. McCall was, in fact, a fictional creation. Producer Evan Chung tells the strange story of how“Convoy”became a cultural phenomenon. He speaks with the songwriters behind“Convoy”– ad executive-turned-lyricist/vocalist Bill Fries and composer Chip Davis (later of Mannheim Steamroller fame) – who reveal the origins of C.W. McCall in a series of Nebraska bread commercials. With its tale of trucker rebellion told through C.B. radios,“Convoy”reflected actual nationwide strikes by truck drivers in the '70s. Historian Meg Jacobs, author of Panic at the Pump: The Energy Crisis and the Transformation of American Politics in the 1970s, explains how the oil crisis of 1973 upended Americans‘ self-perception as consumers and led to turmoil across the country. Like the song“Convoy”itself, it’s an odd, rollicking tale that takes many surprising turns.

Go to episode 598