Results for Kim Deal

classic album dissections
DoolittleDoolittle available on iTunes

The Pixies Doolittle

This week Jim and Greg conduct one of their patented Classic Album Dissections. They decided to focus on a landmark album in indie rock: Doolittle by The Pixies. As an added bonus, they're joined by one of the creators of Doolittle, Pixies singer and songwriter Charles Thompson aka Black Francis aka Frank Black. Charles and bandmates Kim Deal, Joey Santiago and David Lovering recently marked the album's 20th anniversary with a tour dedicated to the record. While artists such as Kurt Cobain have cited it as a major influence, Doolittle was a slow burn record. After its 1989 release, it didn't achieve gold status until almost a decade later.

As Charles explains to Jim and Greg, his vocal style and lyrics were an amalgamation of his upbringing and the art and ideas floating around him at that time. It's a unique mix of preaching, surrealism and even sexual frustration. But, the songwriter warns against dissecting the lyrics too closely. He loves words for words' sake.

The lead singer also credits producer Gil Norton for the mix of“raw and fancy”that people associate with The Pixies. He polished up their sound, but knew well enough to leave a little roughness around the edges. Another component of the sweet but scary mix is Joey Santiago's guitar playing. Charles describes it as just like the guitarist's own personality-sweet and gentle like a little kid, but capable of smashing something to bits.

At the end of their discussion Jim and Greg ask Charles/Black/Frank to choose a favorite track from Doolittle. He goes with "Monkey Gone to Heaven," a song that encapsulates all of the album's elements-humor, darkness, violence, love, hope and references to the nautical and the mythological. Finally, Charles sees it as a great example of the yin and yang connection between him and singer Kim Deal.

Go to episode 217
reviews
Mountain Battles (Bonus Track Version)Mountain Battles available on iTunes

The Breeders Mountain Battles

Sister act The Breeders also have a new album out called Mountain Battles. While Kim and Kelley Deal had enormous success in the '90s alt-rock era with Last Splash and the single "Cannonball," they've only released one album this decade. So is Mountain Battles worth the wait? Unfortunately Jim and Greg would say no. While pop tracks like "It's the Love" hearken back to the willfully amateurish, hook-filled songs of Last Splash, Greg was disappointed with the remainder of the record. He suspects Kim Deal may have lost her hook-writing ability. Jim never really understood the appeal of The Breeders, and this album was particularly difficult for him to listen to. There were long stretches with no beat, no melody, and worst of all, no spark. Both critics give Mountain Battles a Trash It.

JimGreg
Go to episode 124
dijs

Greg

“Where Is My Mind?”The Pixies

Greg's Desert Island Jukebox pick this week was inspired by the odd, but successful, pairing of Gnarls Barkley members Cee-Lo Green and DJ Danger Mouse. He believes that the tension between opposites can often make for great rock music, even if it doesn't lead to longevity. An example of this good tension can be heard in the music of The Pixies. Black Francis'“serial killer vocals”mixed with Kim Deal's beautiful harmonies created a sound that was both punk and pop. And one of Greg's fondest concert memories is of the band reuniting in 2004 to perform "Where Is My Mind?" That's why he decided to take the original version with him to the Desert Island Jukebox.

Go to episode 122