Results for Hey Jude


In Memoriam: Rick Hall

Rick Hall Greg pays tribute to the late Rick Hall, a producer and owner at FAME Studios in Muscle Shoals, Alabama. There, he worked with legendary artists like The Staple Singers, Aretha Franklin, Etta James and more. Hall died in early January at the age of 85. Greg chose to play Wilson Pickett's cover of The Beatles' "Hey Jude," which also featured a young Duane Allman on guitar. He thinks it's a great example of Hall's producing prowess and the kind of music he oversaw in Muscle Shoals.

Go to episode 633

Music News

One of the biggest news stories of 2008 is undoubtedly the economy. But how does that relate to music? According to Professor Terry Pettijohn there are links between musical tastes and economic patterns. In a study published in Psychology of Music, Pettijohn and fellow researcher Donald Sacco, explain that during times of socioeconomic challenges, popular songs are more“meaningful.”But, during easier times, the hits are more fun and frivolous. For example, during the economic boom of the late '50s, songs like "At the Hop" were all the rage. And in 1968, during a period of social unrest, people were attracted to "Hey Jude." So, what does this say about our current society?

Go to episode 162

Music News

The first news story this week involves a deal made between the band Korn and the concert promoters formally known as Clear Channel-Live Nation. Korn, its label, and Live Nation, which runs about 70% of venues across the country, have agreed to share profits from record and ticket sales. This kind of synergy helps sell the Korn brand and maintain the idea of music acts as corporations. And, as Greg points out, deals like this could really revolutionize the music industry. Korn is not the first group to operate this way, however. British pop sensation Robbie Williams struck such a deal in 2002. Fellow Brits Radiohead, on the other hand, have chosen to go a completely different route. By not working with corporate promoters at all, they avoid the corporate concert machine entirely. As Radiohead fans in Chicago know, though, this is not an easy task.

Next up in the news is the bankruptcy announcement made by the largest chain of music stores, Musicland. While our hosts now prefer to support independent music stores, Jim (who was once a Musicland employee of sorts) remembers buying his first record, an album by King Crimson, at a similar chain store. For Jim and Greg, and many music fans who grew up shopping for music at the mall, the fall of Musicland is really the end of an era — or the death of a dinosaur.

Also making headlines this week is the always-controversial rapper Eminem. He and ex-wife Kimberly Mathers remarried. Like Sid and Nancy, and Kurt and Courtney before them, Marshall and Kim have a love story for the ages. Kim, both muse and mother, has managed to overlook some of the less kind words Eminem has said about her. Therefore, the romantics on the Sound Opinions staff wishes to congratulate those crazy kids. Mazel Tov, Em and Kim!

The Rolling Stones also make an appearance in the news. The latest all-stars to perform in the Superbowl Halftime Show, the Stones can hope to appeal to all generations of viewers. The Superbowl, however, seems a bit concerned. Despite the fact that the average age of a Stone is 65, halftime show producers initially tried to ban people over the age of 45 from coming up on stage to dance. The ban has since been removed, but sports fans shouldn't expect to see the Ashlee Simpson crowd getting down to "Start Me Up."

Finally, Jim and Greg remember soul great Wilson Pickett, who died Thursday. The singer, often called“Wicked Pickett,”was known for his wicked sound and behavior. Pickett, who grew up on a sharecropping farm in Alabama, fled to the north to make music. He later returned to the south to record some of his most famous songs, including "Mustang Sally," "In the Midnight Hour" and "Land of a 1000 Dances," which was embraced by punk rockers like Patti Smith. Pickett did covers as well. Listen to his version of "Hey Jude," which never ended up on a regular studio release, but can be heard on Pickett compilations.

Go to episode 8