Results for Etta James

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Unfinished BusinessUnfinished Business available on iTunes

Wanda Jackson Unfinished Business

Wanda Jackson, Queen of Rockabilly since 1954, is out with a new album. Unfinished Business - like last year's The Party Ain't Over - is produced by a young fan. This time, Jim explains, it's Justin Townes Earle, not Jack White, at the helm. Neither Jim nor Greg was a fan of the Caribbean-flavored, White-produced The Party Ain't Over. Does Earle fare better? Greg says yes. You have to remember, he says, that in addition to being rockabilly royalty, Jackson has a background in country and gospel. She sounds perfectly at home covering artists like Freddy King and Etta James. Greg gives Unfinished Business a Buy It. Jim agrees that Earle played it smart by keeping Wanda in her comfort zone and allowing her feistiness to shine through. But he says there are three or four other Jackson albums he'd recommend over this one. He gives Unfinished Business a Try It.

JimGreg
Go to episode 359
lists

Days of the Week Songs

To Jim and Greg, each day of the week has its own special flavor. Sensitive songwriters pick up on this; it's one of the reasons rock n' roll is rife with Days of the Week songs. This week, Jim and Greg run down their favorites:

  • Joe Jackson, "Sunday Papers"
  • T-Bone Walker, "Stormy Monday (But Tuesday is Just as Bad)"
  • The Rolling Stones, "Ruby Tuesday"
  • Charles Mingus, "Wednesday Nigh Prayer Meeting"
  • Morphine, "Thursday"
  • Cee Lo Green, "Bright Lights Bigger City"
  • Elton John, "Saturday Night's Alright for Fighting"
  • Etta James, "A Sunday Kind of Love"
Go to episode 352

Songs About First Impressions

Whether or not you believe in love at first sight, there's something exciting about laying eyes on someone special for the first time. Jim and Greg share their favorite songs about first impressions.

Go to episode 585
news

Music News

Remember your first symphonic experience? It was probably Peter & the Wolf. But a recent Supreme Court decision will likely mean fewer performances of Prokofiev's classic and other early 20th century works. By a 6-2 vote, the justices upheld a previous federal law that allows copyright protection to be restored to works previously entered into public domain. So musical works by Shostakovich and Stravinsky, in addition to films by Hitchcock and books by C.S. Lewis, are not as inexpensive as they once were. Jim and Greg talk to lead plaintiff Lawrence Golan about this court battle and what the ruling will mean for conductors and musicians like him.

The internet remains the Wild Wild West, but infamous figures like Billy the Kid and Jesse James have got nothing on Kim Dotcom. Federal authorities shut down his popular file-sharing site Megaupload.com, stating it was part of an international criminal ring. Certainly Dotcom lived the life of an international criminal, owning a $23 million estate in New Zealand, as well as 18 luxury cars with vanity plates like“Mafia”and“Guilty.”But for many, Megaupload was a pretty ordinary site, one used for legitimate content, not just pirated materials. This re-raises the question of how responsible internet sites are for how their customers use them.

After singer Etta James died last week at age 73, many people were playing her classic ballads like "At Last." But, as Greg explains, she was much more than just a ballad singer. Etta was the first great female star on Chess Records, and even at a young age had a big, bawdy voice and a style that was pretty adult for the times. Just listen to her 1966 song "In the Basement."

Go to episode 322

Music News

Maurice White, founder of the great R&B band Earth, Wind & Fire, passed away on February 4 at the age of 74. White started in Chicago as a jazz drummer, playing on Chess Records sessions by Willie Dixon and Etta James before being recruited into Ramsey Lewis's band. The crossover success of that gig allowed him to finance Earth, Wind & Fire, an extravagant showpiece band that could contain more than a dozen members – a flashy update of the big bands of the swing era. Greg goes so far as to call White the "Duke Ellington of R&B." Blending Latin music, R&B, jazz, and African music, Earth, Wind & Fire scored a string of hits in the 1970s. For Greg, the epitome of the band was the 1975 song "Shining Star" which offered a uplifting message during a period of racial strife.

Go to episode 533

Music News

What does it say about the music industry when 2011's highest-earning musician didn't release any new music? Dr. Dre tops Forbes' annual list of music industry earners with an income of $110 million, beating out industry heavyweights like Bieber and Macca. But fans are still waiting for Detox - Dre's highly anticipated follow up to 2001 and The Chronic. So how'd Dre do it? By selling a ton of headphones.

Throughout the year Jim and Greg have paid homage to the musical greats we've lost. There were some big names in 2012 - Whitney Houston, Etta James, Levon Helm, Donna Summer, and Davy Jones just to name a few. With the year coming to a close, Jim and Greg take a moment to recognize more artists they didn't get to earlier this year: DC's own Godfather of Go-go Chuck Brown, and Eastern music ambassador Ravi Shankar. They play Brown's "Bustin' Loose" and Shankar's "Dhun (Fast Teental)" from the sitar master's 1967 Monterey Pop Festival performance in appreciation.

Go to episode 370